CFIF Media Center
Can President Trump Pardon Himself?

Can President Trump Pardon Himself?
June 22, 2018 • 08:55 am

Ilya Shapiro, Senior Fellow in Constitutional Studies at the Cato Institute and Editor-in-Chief of the Cato Supreme Court Review, discusses whether there is constitutional authority or precedent for President Trump to pardon himself should the need arise, and Supreme Court decisions this term.

Why We Should Care About Unappointed Judges

Why We Should Care About Unappointed Judges
June 22, 2018 • 08:34 am

Andrew Grossman, Partner at Baker & Hostetler, discusses the role of administrative law judges, why we should care, and the grant of certiorari before the U.S. Supreme Court in a case relating to class action awards.

The Debate Surrounding Autonomous Cars

The Debate Surrounding Autonomous Cars
June 22, 2018 • 08:16 am

Marc Scribner, Senior Fellow at the Competitive Enterprise Institute, discusses the Self Drive Act and the AV Start Act, and why slowing down driverless cars would be a fatal mistake.

The Fair Housing Act at 50

The Fair Housing Act at 50
June 22, 2018 • 07:53 am

Richard Sander, Nationally-acclaimed UCLA Law Professor and Economist, discusses his contention that the Fair Housing Act was successful in promoting racial integration in many cities, how housing segregation is the most significant factor driving racial inequality, and his latest book, Moving Toward Integration.

Spirit of Singapore: U.S. and North Korea Summit

Spirit of Singapore: U.S. and North Korea Summit
June 19, 2018 • 06:27 am

Bruce Herschensohn, CFIF Board Member, Political Commentator, Author and Senior Fellow at Pepperdine University School of Public Policy, discusses the Singapore summit, whether it's about substance or symbolism, what will define a successful summit, and President Trump's foreign policy.

Net Neutrality: Why the Sky is Not Falling

Net Neutrality: Why the Sky is Not Falling
June 15, 2018 • 07:56 am

Timothy Lee, CFIF's Senior Vice President for Legal and Public Affairs, discusses the first day of the repeal of the FCC’s Title II/Net Neutrality rules, what that may (or may not) mean for the internet and consumers, and America's recent positive jobs report.

America’s Outdated and Outrageous Federal Sugar Policy

America’s Outdated and Outrageous Federal Sugar Policy
June 15, 2018 • 07:03 am

Karen Kerrigan, President and CEO of the Small Business & Entrepreneurship Council, provides an update on the Farm Bill and the sugar reform amendment proposed therein, the impact to consumers and small businesses, and next steps to reform the outdated and outrageous policy.

Overcoming ObamaCare

Overcoming ObamaCare
June 08, 2018 • 09:44 am

Michael Cannon, Cato Institute's Director of Health Policy Studies, discusses how HHS may soon restore consumer protections for short-term health plans, expanding health insurance protections that could make coverage more affordable.

Steps to Better School Security

Steps to Better School Security
June 08, 2018 • 09:19 am

Steven P. Bucci, Ph.D., Visiting Fellow in the Douglas and Sarah Allison Center at The Heritage Foundation, discusses the ongoing debate regarding school security and four interconnected steps that should be undertaken.

Florida's CRC Submits Final Report to Secretary of State

Florida's CRC Submits Final Report to Secretary of State
June 08, 2018 • 08:51 am

Commissioners Brecht Heuchan and Fred Karlinsky, Florida Constitution Revision Commission, discuss the eight revisions submitted by the Commission as proposed constitutional amendments on the 2018 General Election ballot for voter consideration.

The Latest Inside (and Outside) the Beltway

The Latest Inside (and Outside) the Beltway
June 01, 2018 • 08:29 am

William J. Conti, Partner at Baker & Hostetler in Washington, DC, discusses the NFL's new anthem policy, whether Senator John McCain should resign, and more.

Betting on When the Betting Begins

Betting on When the Betting Begins
June 01, 2018 • 08:01 am

Michelle Minton, Senior Fellow at the Competitive Enterprise Institute, discusses what happens next now that the Supreme Court ended the federal sports betting prohibition, and what the "integrity fee" is that is being proposed by some sports leagues.

Why Ordinary Rules of Diplomacy Might Not Work with North Korea

Why Ordinary Rules of Diplomacy Might Not Work with North Korea
June 01, 2018 • 07:10 am

Nicholas Eberstadt, the Henry Wendt Chair in Political Economy at the American Enterprise Institute, discusses why the U.S. must have a radically different approach to diplomacy with North Korea, whether denuclearization is even an option with North Korea, and what President Trump can learn from President Reagan.


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