ALEXANDRIA, VA – Today, the Federal Communications Commission ("FCC") voted to advance a Notice of…
CFIF on Twitter CFIF on YouTube
CFIF Applauds FCC Vote to Advance NPRM to Restore Internet Freedom

ALEXANDRIA, VA – Today, the Federal Communications Commission ("FCC") voted to advance a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) on the "Restoring Internet Freedom" proposal championed by Chairman Ajit Pai and Commisser Mike O'Reilly that would return federal internet regulatory policy to the light-touch approach that prevailed from the 1990s onward, until the Obama Administration FCC moved to reclassify the internet as a "public utility" in 2015.

In response, Center for Individual Freedom ("CFIF") Senior Vice President of Legal and Public Affairs Timothy Lee issued the following statement:

"Beginning in the 1990s, the internet flourished and transformed our world like no innovation in history for a simple reason:  Administrations of both political parties over two decades, beginning…[more]

May 18, 2017 • 12:36 pm

Liberty Update

CFIFs latest news, commentary and alerts delivered to your inbox.
Jester's CourtroomLegal tales stranger than stranger than fiction: Ridiculous and sometimes funny lawsuits plaguing our courts.
Don't Let Politics Ruin Baseball Print
By David Harsanyi
Friday, March 03 2017
Baseball won't change politics, but politics will ruin baseball.

Jayson Stark, a longtime baseball writer for ESPN, recently asked whether Major League Baseball players' lack of political involvement is an abdication of their responsibility as citizens. He asked: "Is 2017 the time for a new code of conduct? Is it time for a more socially aware culture  in this, the sport of Jackie Robinson?"

What makes 2017 so special? Well, there's a Republican in the White House, of course, which means the world is on the brink of calamity. So when Stark pens a piece lamenting the lack of political participation in the league of Jackie Robinson, he isn't curious about why more African-American athletes aren't protesting the destructive role of teachers unions in black communities, or why athletes aren't speaking out about the spike in crime in cities controlled by Democrats. He is talking about President Donald Trump. If that were not the case, he would have written something along the same lines in 2010, when the nation was just as divided and the issues it faced were just as contentious.

Stark notes, for instance, that there was a "social media storm" when St. Louis Cardinals center fielder Dexter Fowler "dared to express personal concern for his wife's Iranian-born family in the wake of President Donald Trump's travel ban."

Don't get me wrong. That struggle is real. Yet if Fowler, who has a daughter, had "dared" bring up the rampant misogynistic culture that permeates Iran (and most of the Islamic world) when President Barack Obama was striking a deal with that country, the reaction would have been far more consequential than some random fans telling him to stick to baseball. If any baseball player had "dared" to bring up the Obama administration's attacks on religious liberty, we'd doubtlessly be immersed in a very different conversation.

So why wasn't 2008 or 2015 the time for a new code of conduct? Because many writers and pundits fail to appreciate that Americans were just as anxious about the presidency of Barack Obama. This is the conceit of Stark's article, and many others.

Chuck Todd of "Meet the Press" points out that baseball led the fight against racial injustice. This is true. Stark writes: "Even after 9/11, when baseball played such a vital role in the healing of America, its most important contribution, Todd says, was just to supply 'the normalcy we all needed every day of the week.'"

Yet, inadvertently (I think), Todd is comparing the lawful, constitutional election of a president who has yet to sign a single piece of consequential legislation with these two great American tragedies. So while Stark is merely asking questions, Todd believes baseball has "an opportunity to heal the country, because of the political, ethnic and racial diversity in its locker room."

For one thing, baseball players already provide a wonderful example of American civility. They do this by not incessantly talking about politics. Baseball is a distraction from politics.

How many voters are going to change their ideological views because Mookie Betts of the Boston Red Sox took a leadership position on, well, whatever it is that Todd believes is dividing Americans? Most voters, I assume, conduct business and relationships with co-workers and family who hold philosophical positions other than their own. Should a cashier at Target or an accountant at H&R Block feel compelled to lecture everyone he or she meets about public policy? What would our communities look like if everyone were an activist? Insufferable, that's what.

Moreover, the MLB's great diversity reflects not only the bravery of Robinson but also his victory. There will never be another Jackie Robinson. We don't need another Jackie Robinson. Baseball already proves that rural whites, Hispanic immigrants, African-Americans and Yankees can all live and play on a team, pull together, aspire to greatness and make a vast amount of money in the process. The ability of diverse people to live peacefully under a free system is the American ideal. Demanding unanimity of opinion is not. In many ways, we still have the former. The latter is what tears us apart.

Perhaps most players realize they've become famous because they can throw and hit, not because they have a position on monetary policy. I'm a free speech absolutist. If baseball players want to complain about Obamacare repeal, that is certainly their prerogative. But they should not be surprised if half the fans react negatively because for fans, baseball is an escape. For players, it is a business.

As one MLB official brimming with common sense told ESPN: "Our role is to provide an environment that's politics-free and controversy-free. I just care about what's best for my team. I don't want to risk losing any fan. I want all our fans to support my team. So I don't think I have the right to take a position that would alienate our customers."

Baseball won't change politics, but politics will ruin baseball.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

David Harsanyi is a senior editor at The Federalist.

Copyright © 2017 Creators.com

Question of the Week   
Who was the first U.S. President to travel abroad while serving in office?
More Questions
Quote of the Day   
 
"It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us -- that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion -- that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain -- that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom -- and that government of the people, by the people,…[more]
 
 
—President Abraham Lincoln, Gettysburg Address, November 19, 1863
— President Abraham Lincoln, Gettysburg Address, November 19, 1863
 
Liberty Poll   

How safe do you currently feel attending events in large venues (concerts, ball games, etc.) in the United States?