In this era of increased harassment and persecution of people on the basis of political viewpoints and…
CFIF on Twitter CFIF on YouTube
First Amendment Rights: Good News from the IRS on Donor Privacy

In this era of increased harassment and persecution of people on the basis of political viewpoints and First Amendment expression, there’s actually good news to report.

In fact, that positive development comes from none other than the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), which few people typically consider a font of good news.

Specifically, the IRS just announced a proposed rule to stop requiring nonprofit organizations to file what’s known as a Form 990 Schedule B, which exposes sensitive donor information not only to the federal government and potential rogues like former IRS official Lois Lerner, but also people who seek to access and use that information to target people on the basis of political belief.

As we at CFIF have long asserted, this welcome move will help protect the…[more]

September 12, 2019 • 11:07 am

Liberty Update

CFIFs latest news, commentary and alerts delivered to your inbox.
Jester's CourtroomLegal tales stranger than stranger than fiction: Ridiculous and sometimes funny lawsuits plaguing our courts.
Home Jester's Courtroom Hottest Ticket Burns Houston Lawyer
Hottest Ticket Burns Houston Lawyer Print
Wednesday, February 27 2019

A Houston lawyer is suing Ticketmaster after it failed to refund his money for tickets he purchased for the wrong day to see the highly popular musical "Hamilton."

According to news reports, Joshua Davis intended to buy three tickets  one each for him, his wife and oldest daughter  to see the popular musical while visiting New York City in March. At some point during the transaction, Davis apparently hit the "back" button and the date reverted back to January 17. Davis claims he thought he stopped the purchase by exiting out of the website, but his credit card was still charged $2,325.20 for the January tickets. After immediately calling Ticketmaster and waiting on hold for an extended period of time, Davis alleges a “resolution specialist” informed him that Ticketmaster refused to make the change or refund the money.

The only recourse Davis claims Ticketmaster allows for purchases made in error is to resell the mistaken tickets (for no less than paid) and with a resale fee to Ticketmaster. Davis’ lawsuit charges fraudulent inducement and breach of contract causes of action, and he claims Ticketmaster violated the Sherman Antitrust Act on the ground that its position in the marketplace constitutes a monopoly on the lawful sale of tickets.

"This isn’t right and it’s unfortunate they refused to treat it as a customer service issue," Davis said. "Thank goodness I have a law license."

Source: law.com

Question of the Week   
On September 11, 2001, the United States was attacked by terrorists using which one of the following?
More Questions
Quote of the Day   
 
"The Democrats, after all, have shown themselves to be thoroughgoing authoritarians. Many of our progressive friends spent the Obama years lecturing us that opposition to the president and his agenda was tantamount to sedition or treason. They tell us now that failing to knuckle under to their political agenda is treason. Democratic prosecutors have been conducting investigations of companies and…[more]
 
 
—Kevin D. Williamson, National Review
— Kevin D. Williamson, National Review
 
Liberty Poll   

Is the desire to withdraw American troops from Afghanistan in conflict with the lessons of September 11, 2001?