For over two weeks now, failed retransmission negotiations between AT&T and Nexstar Media Group…
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TV Blackouts Reconfirm Need for Free Market Regulatory Reform

For over two weeks now, failed retransmission negotiations between AT&T and Nexstar Media Group have deprived customers across the United States of 120 Nexstar television stations in 97 markets.

That's unfortunately something to which far too many Americans have become accustomed recently, as 2019 has already witnessed more TV blackouts than any year in history.  And the news only gets worse:  CBS is now warning that stations in numerous major markets, including New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Philadelphia, Dallas and others, could be blacked out as this week concludes.

Here's the overarching problem.  Current laws dating all the way back to 1992 empower the federal government to pick TV market winners and losers by tipping the scales during negotiations.  Those laws governing what…[more]

July 18, 2019 • 08:58 pm

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Home Jester's Courtroom Hottest Ticket Burns Houston Lawyer
Hottest Ticket Burns Houston Lawyer Print
Wednesday, February 27 2019

A Houston lawyer is suing Ticketmaster after it failed to refund his money for tickets he purchased for the wrong day to see the highly popular musical "Hamilton."

According to news reports, Joshua Davis intended to buy three tickets  one each for him, his wife and oldest daughter  to see the popular musical while visiting New York City in March. At some point during the transaction, Davis apparently hit the "back" button and the date reverted back to January 17. Davis claims he thought he stopped the purchase by exiting out of the website, but his credit card was still charged $2,325.20 for the January tickets. After immediately calling Ticketmaster and waiting on hold for an extended period of time, Davis alleges a “resolution specialist” informed him that Ticketmaster refused to make the change or refund the money.

The only recourse Davis claims Ticketmaster allows for purchases made in error is to resell the mistaken tickets (for no less than paid) and with a resale fee to Ticketmaster. Davis’ lawsuit charges fraudulent inducement and breach of contract causes of action, and he claims Ticketmaster violated the Sherman Antitrust Act on the ground that its position in the marketplace constitutes a monopoly on the lawful sale of tickets.

"This isn’t right and it’s unfortunate they refused to treat it as a customer service issue," Davis said. "Thank goodness I have a law license."

Source: law.com

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