In this era of increased harassment and persecution of people on the basis of political viewpoints and…
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First Amendment Rights: Good News from the IRS on Donor Privacy

In this era of increased harassment and persecution of people on the basis of political viewpoints and First Amendment expression, there’s actually good news to report.

In fact, that positive development comes from none other than the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), which few people typically consider a font of good news.

Specifically, the IRS just announced a proposed rule to stop requiring nonprofit organizations to file what’s known as a Form 990 Schedule B, which exposes sensitive donor information not only to the federal government and potential rogues like former IRS official Lois Lerner, but also people who seek to access and use that information to target people on the basis of political belief.

As we at CFIF have long asserted, this welcome move will help protect the…[more]

September 12, 2019 • 11:07 am

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Jester's CourtroomLegal tales stranger than stranger than fiction: Ridiculous and sometimes funny lawsuits plaguing our courts.
Home Jester's Courtroom Finding a Home for Justice
Finding a Home for Justice Print
Tuesday, August 27 2019

West Virginia Governor Jim Justice is being sued by a state lawmaker who claims Justice is violating the state Constitution by not living in the state capital.

According to news reports, Justice, a Republican billionaire who owns more than 100 companies, is being sued by Democratic Delegate Isaac Sponaugle who cites the state Constitution as requiring the governor to "reside at the seat of government."

In declaring the lawsuit a "frivolous political stunt designed to distract from the important work that needs to be done for the state," Justice's lawyers have asked, "Is he 'residing' in Charleston if he sleeps there but departs in the morning and spends his waking hours elsewhere? Conversely, is he 'residing' in Charleston if he spends some portion of his waking hours there but sleeps elsewhere?"

Following a recent hearing, a circuit court judge extended the case by requesting more documents from Justice’s legal team and Sponaugle.

Justice has acknowledged he lives in Lewisburg, a city about 100 miles from the governor’s mansion in Charleston but not far from The Greenbrier Resort, which he owns.

Sponaugle said the governor should have to comply with the state Constitution and live in the capital. “All I’m asking for the man to do is follow the Constitution and he has the inability to do that,” he said.

“You can have more than one residence, and he resides in the capital and he resides wherever he chooses on a nightly basis. But the fact remains he continues to perform the duties as governor in his discretion, and he resides as the Constitution requires in Charleston,” Justice attorney Michael Carey said.

At issue as well is the authority of the courts to determine the whereabouts of the state's chief executive. Justice and his lawyers have called the case "a total waste of time."

Source: cbs17.com

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On September 11, 2001, the United States was attacked by terrorists using which one of the following?
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— Jim Geraghty, National Review
 
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