In an interview with CFIF, Dr. Scott Gottlieb, Resident Fellow at the American Enterprise Institute,…
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High Risk: The Debate Over the Price of Specialty Drugs and Zika Virus

In an interview with CFIF, Dr. Scott Gottlieb, Resident Fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, discusses the history and regulations surrounding drug prices, who should finance important medical advancements, and the continuing Zika threat.

Listen to the interview here.…[more]

September 27, 2016 • 01:11 pm

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Home Press Room CFIF Blasts DOE for Release of Overly Broad Gainful Employment Rule
CFIF Blasts DOE for Release of Overly Broad Gainful Employment Rule Print
Thursday, June 02 2011

ALEXANDRIA, VA – Timothy Lee, Vice President of Legal and Public Affairs at the Center for Individual Freedom ("CFIF"), issued the following statement today in response to the Department of Education’s release of its final Gainful Employment rule.

“The Department of Education’s final rule on ‘Gainful Employment’ represents the worst in bureaucratic regulatory overreach and will eliminate competition in higher education – an industry that critically needs innovation and multiple options. The Department of Education has poorly handled this issue from the beginning, from a defective Government Accountability Office report to allegations of the department’s collaboration with Wall Street short-sellers. As an organization that works to preserve free market principles against federal government assault, CFIF is extremely displeased with DoEd’s final ruling. I urge Congress once again to strongly consider defunding the Gainful Employment regulations.”

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