An instructive myth-versus-fact visual when it comes to public assumptions regarding corporate profits…
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Image of the Day: Myth Versus Fact Regarding Corporate Profits

An instructive myth-versus-fact visual when it comes to public assumptions regarding corporate profits, courtesy of AEI:

. [caption id="" align="aligncenter" width="520" caption="Myth Versus Fact: Corporate Profits"][/caption]

.…[more]

January 17, 2018 • 01:08 pm

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Home Press Room CFIF Blasts DOE for Release of Overly Broad Gainful Employment Rule
CFIF Blasts DOE for Release of Overly Broad Gainful Employment Rule Print
Thursday, June 02 2011

ALEXANDRIA, VA – Timothy Lee, Vice President of Legal and Public Affairs at the Center for Individual Freedom ("CFIF"), issued the following statement today in response to the Department of Education’s release of its final Gainful Employment rule.

“The Department of Education’s final rule on ‘Gainful Employment’ represents the worst in bureaucratic regulatory overreach and will eliminate competition in higher education – an industry that critically needs innovation and multiple options. The Department of Education has poorly handled this issue from the beginning, from a defective Government Accountability Office report to allegations of the department’s collaboration with Wall Street short-sellers. As an organization that works to preserve free market principles against federal government assault, CFIF is extremely displeased with DoEd’s final ruling. I urge Congress once again to strongly consider defunding the Gainful Employment regulations.”

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