In an interview with CFIF, Aloysius Hogan, Senior Fellow at the Competitive Enterprise Institute, discusses…
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Big Labor's Latest Targets: Women and Student Athletes

In an interview with CFIF, Aloysius Hogan, Senior Fellow at the Competitive Enterprise Institute, discusses the recent SCOTUS decision in Harris v. Quinn, labor unions’ targeting of women, and the latest on the proposed unionization of student athletes. 

Listen to the interview here.…[more]

July 28, 2014 • 11:28 am

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Home Press Room CFIF Seeks Narrow Rulemaking from FEC Regarding Rules Governing Disclosure of Electioneering Communications by Corporations and Labor Unions
CFIF Seeks Narrow Rulemaking from FEC Regarding Rules Governing Disclosure of Electioneering Communications by Corporations and Labor Unions Print
Tuesday, October 09 2012

ALEXANDRIA, VA – The Center for Individual Freedom (“CFIF”) last week filed a Petition for Rulemaking with the Federal Election Commission ("FEC") that seeks a narrowly focused rulemaking to update and clarify the rules governing disclosure of any electioneering communications by corporations and labor unions.

CFIF's request is made in light of the U.S. Supreme Court’s Citizens United decision and in response to a recent decision of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit, which concluded in CFIF v. Van Hollen that the meaning, proper application and interaction of the current regulations can be improved.

Download CFIF’s Petition here (PDF).

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Mandatory vaccination laws were first enacted in the U.S. to prevent the spread of which one of the following communicable diseases?
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"Congress can overturn an executive order. It can overturn parts of an executive order. If the executive order is based on a statute, Congress can change the statute, thereby nullifying the order. Congress can also refuse to fund activities stemming from all or part of the executive order. ...  In addition, a targeted move to overturn an executive order on immigration -- an order which could, according…[more]
 
 
—Byron York, The Washington Examiner Chief Political Correspondent
— Byron York, The Washington Examiner Chief Political Correspondent
 
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Is significant, proven plagiarism sufficient to disqualify, in the minds of voters, any candidate for public office?