In a brilliant primer entitled "Refute Palestinian Lies to Promote Mideast Peace" in The Wall Street…
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Notable Quote: Israel's Right to Exist

In a brilliant primer entitled "Refute Palestinian Lies to Promote Mideast Peace" in The Wall Street Journal, Max Singer refutes a persistent myth that the United States must work to refute:

[D]espite widespread use of the term in diplomatic documents and debate, there is no such thing as 'occupied Palestinian territory' because there has never been a Palestinian territory to occupy.  As some Palestinians point out, they have never had a state of their own.  This is far more than a game of semantics.  If the land was Palestinian, then Israel could have stolen it.  If the land isn't Palestinian, then Israel couldn't have stolen it.  It's critical that the U.S. actively combat the falsehood that Israel exists on stolen Palestinian land."

 …[more]

December 13, 2018 • 05:34 pm

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Home Press Room CFIF Poll: Alaska Voters Want Congress to Address Internet Privacy and Transparency Far More Than Just "Net Neutrality"
CFIF Poll: Alaska Voters Want Congress to Address Internet Privacy and Transparency Far More Than Just "Net Neutrality" Print
Monday, February 12 2018

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Today, the Center for Individual Freedom (CFIF) released a poll of Alaska voters examining consumer concerns related to the internet, finding that consumers in the state ultimately prefer comprehensive legislation to protect all of their internet activity rather than congressional action that simply reinstates the Federal Communications Commission's (FCC) old "net neutrality" rules.

Notably, 86% of the respondents say they have become more concerned about the privacy of their information on the internet. In line with those sentiments, Alaska voters want Congress to act on legislation that helps ensure consumers are protected and treated fairly by all internet companies – Internet Service Providers (ISPs), search engines and social media companies – along with the principles broadly identified as “net neutrality.”

Overall, when given the choice between Congress reinstating the FCC's 2015 "net neutrality" rules that apply only to ISPs, or Congress passing legislation that both puts the tenets of “net neutrality” into law and ensures that they are treated in a fair and neutral manner by all internet companies (including on privacy), they prefer the latter by a 55-19% margin.

Key findings indicate near universal support for federal legislation that applies certain “guiding principles” of neutrality, transparency and privacy protections to all internet companies:

• 85% - Every ISP would need to disclose accurate and relevant information in plain language regarding the price, performance, and network management practices of its services.
• 87% - Social media sites and apps, and search engines would be required to fully disclose their practices on censorship, child protection and prohibiting the use of their services for illegal activities.
• 87% - ISPs, social media sites and apps, and search engines would all have to follow the same rules to protect your privacy and the security of your data.
• 87% - Consumers would have the freedom to use the personal devices and apps they want.
• 80% - ISPs could not block or slow down websites or services that consumers access on the internet.
• 82% - To ensure a level playing field for all competitors, there would be one set of rules that apply to all internet companies.

While Alaska voters may think “net neutrality” is important, their concerns about privacy, censorship and trust on the internet go significantly beyond the products and services offered by an ISP. Voters feel strongly that all internet companies – ISPs, search engines and social media companies – should be governed by the same comprehensive consumer-focused legislation that addresses internet privacy and transparency far more than just “net neutrality” applied solely to ISPs.

Read the full poll memo here.

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Founded in 1998, the Center for Individual Freedom is a constitutional and free market advocacy organization with hundreds of thousands of activists and supporters nationwide.

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