John Lott, our favorite economist at least in the arena of criminology and Second Amendment scholarship…
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Stat of the Day: Everywhere Guns Are Banned, Murder Rates Increase

John Lott, our favorite economist at least in the arena of criminology and Second Amendment scholarship, cogently summarizes the actual, real-world, data-based sociological effect of "gun control" laws:

. While gun bans (either a ban on all guns or on all handguns) have been imposed in many places, every time guns have been banned, murder rates have gone up.

One would think that one time, just out of simple randomness, murder rates would have gone down or at least stayed the same.  Yet in every single case for which we have crime data both before and after the ban, murder rates have gone up, often by huge amounts."

. It's almost as if more guns mean less crime.…[more]

October 20, 2017 • 11:58 am

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CFIF Statement on Introduction of Copyright Office Reform Legislation Print E-mail
Friday, March 24 2017

ALEXANDRIA, VA - This week, the Chairmen and Ranking Members of both the Senate and House Judiciary committees introduced important legislation - the Register of Copyrights Selection and Accountability Act – which, among other things, makes the U.S. Register of Copyrights a position appointed by the president subject to Senate confirmation. 

In response, Center for Individual Freedom (CFIF) Senior Vice President of Legal and Public Affairs Timothy Lee issued the following statement: 

"CFIF applauds this much-needed legislation as a crucial step towards more thorough U.S. Copyright Office modernization in order to meet the new challenges of the 21st century.  Strong copyright protection constitutes a core component of our domestic economy, and our world-leading creative community in particular.  American copyright-related industries contribute over $1 trillion to the American economy, as well as accounting for 5.5 million jobs, and remain a significant export sector that only keeps growing," Lee said. 

"The Copyright Office is crucial in that realm, administering the registration and recordation systems, as well as advising Congress, our judicial system and other pivotal parties on both domestic and international copyright matters.  Unfortunately, under the current system created over 120 years ago, the Office is currently housed within the Library of Congress, which faces its own challenges and responsibilities.  Consequently, the Copyright Office has struggled to keep pace in the increasingly digital economy despite repeated calls urging modernization," Lee continued. 

"CFIF therefore applauds the long-needed legislative effort to begin modernizing the Copyright Office in this way.  Although only a first step in broader Copyright Office reform, it is an important one.  It also offers a rare bipartisan opportunity for Congress, in addition to how it helps American consumers and our creative and innovation communities.  Every living former Register of Copyrights has urged Copyright Office restructuring, and CFIF agrees wholeheartedly with that broad consensus.  American consumers, our economy and export industries stand to benefit immensely from this important step,” Lee concluded. 

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Question of the Week   
Which one of the following battles effectively ended the American Revolutionary War?
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Quote of the Day   
 
"History will record that the Islamic State caliphate -- a bizarre pseudo-state founded on illusory goals, created by a global horde of jihadis, and enforced with perverted viciousness -- survived for three years, three months and some eighteen days. The fall of Raqqa, the nominal ISIS capital, was proclaimed on Tuesday by the U.S.-backed militia that spearheaded the offensive, a coalition of Kurdish…[more]
 
 
—Robin Wright, Newyorker.com Contributing Writer
— Robin Wright, Newyorker.com Contributing Writer
 
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