So there's grave new trouble for New York Governor Andrew Cuomo's crony-capitalist, climate alarmist…
CFIF on Twitter CFIF on YouTube
Crony Capitalist N.Y. Utility Subsidy Boondoggle Now Facing Federal Lawsuit

So there's grave new trouble for New York Governor Andrew Cuomo's crony-capitalist, climate alarmist utility subsidy boondoggle:  a federal lawsuit.

Since its introduction in August, CFIF has been exposing Cuomo's "Clean Energy Standard" (CES), a scheme approved by the state of New York's Public Service Commission made up entirely of his own appointees.  In a nutshell, the CES creates an artificial mandate that 50% of all the state's energy be generated by carbon-neutral plants just 13 years from now.   At a minimum, the CES will cost $1 billion in its first two years alone, and an estimated $8 billion over its 13-year existence.  And it illustrates the sort of crony capitalism that is all too common at the federal, state and local levels because the plan's subsidies will be steered…[more]

October 21, 2016 • 06:25 pm

Liberty Update

CFIFs latest news, commentary and alerts delivered to your inbox.
Jester's CourtroomLegal tales stranger than stranger than fiction: Ridiculous and sometimes funny lawsuits plaguing our courts.
Press Releases
Xfinity TV Partner Program Announcement Demonstrates the Folly of FCC's Set-Top Box Regulatory Proposal Print E-mail
Wednesday, April 20 2016

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The Center for Individual Freedom (CFIF) today highlighted how today's Xfinity TV Partner Program announcement demonstrates the folly of the Federal Communications Commission's (FCC's) new proposal to regulate set-top cable boxes. 

“Obama's FCC seeks to impose a 1990s-vintage, one-size-fits-all mandate to make cable TV set-top boxes artificially compatible with third-party devices," said Timothy Lee, CFIF's Senior Vice President of Legal and Public Affairs.  "As we have detailed, the proposed regulation constitutes crony capitalism in its worst form, it poses a threat to consumer privacy, it undermines the creative community and it jeopardizes intellectual property protections by potentially facilitating piracy. It also constitutes an anachronism in that it freezes in place an outdated set-top box model that is already being left behind by technological advance and private sector innovation. Cable companies and other entertainment industry players are already abandoning traditional cable boxes in favor of devices owned and maintained by individual consumers as they choose," Lee added. 

Today's announcement of the new joint Xfinity Partner Program between Comcast, Samsung and Roku illustrates that reality.  Under the new partnership, consumers can access their cable subscription via a simple app, without the need for a set-top box at all.  Accordingly, it will allow access to live, on-demand, cloud, DVR and other televised content on smart TVs and other IP-enabled technology. 

"This shows that the video entertainment and app markets continue to evolve alongside consumer demand, rendering the FCC's set-top box proposal obsolete before it can even be imposed," Lee said.  "The new regulation would disrupt market innovation of this sort. The marketplace is working, and this latest FCC 'solution' to a non-existent problem will only create more problems. Congressional leaders, the innovation community, consumer groups and everyday American consumers should stand together and oppose this latest FCC overreach." 

Read CFIF's full commentary on the import of today's announcement here




Page 15 of 141
Question of the Week   
How many viewers watched the first-ever televised presidential debate?
More Questions
Quote of the Day   
"Iran's leaders, according to the nation's state-run press, now expect 'billions of dollars' in exchange for US hostages they're holding in Tehran's notorious Evin prison. Proving, yet again, the problem with ransoming hostages. ...Iran's hostage-taking habit is just one more mess the next president will have to clean up."…[more]
—New York Post Editorial Board
— New York Post Editorial Board
Liberty Poll   

Open Enrollment for 2017 ObamaCare coverage begins Nov. 1. The administration plans to push to enroll more young people, the majority of whom have declined, despite fines for non-compliance. Will the new efforts be any more successful than previous ones?