What’s old is somehow new again on the political left. Desperate for what they perceive as street…
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House Democrats Revive Obama FCC's Ruinous Effort to Regulate Internet

What’s old is somehow new again on the political left.

Desperate for what they perceive as street cred, leftists continue to repackage failed policies as somehow novel, in a destructive race to claim the most extreme realms of the political continuum.

Merely three decades after it was consigned to the dustbin of failed ideas, socialism actually maintains renewed popularity on the left.  According to Gallup, a majority of Democrats no longer view capitalism favorably, but almost 60% view socialism positively.

People like Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D – New York) advocate a return to income tax rates not seen since President John F. Kennedy began cutting them.  Thirty-five years after Jeane Kirkpatrick delivered her famous 1984 Republican convention speech castigating…[more]

April 12, 2019 • 01:44 pm

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Press Releases
CFIF Supports Video Marketplace Reform Bill Introduced by Congressman Steve Scalise Print E-mail
Monday, July 23 2018

ALEXANDRIA, VA – Today, Congressman Steve Scalise (R - Louisiana) introduced "The Next Generation Television Marketplace Act," which would reform America's obsolete and stifling video marketplace laws. In response, Center for Individual Freedom ("CFIF") Senior Vice President of Legal and Public Affairs Timothy Lee issued the following statement: 

"On behalf of over 300,000 supporters and activists across the nation, CFIF enthusiastically supports the Next Generation Television Marketplace Act, which would reduce federal government interference in the U.S. video marketplace, and allow negotiations between broadcasters and video programming distributors to occur in more of a free market environment.  Current laws, enacted all the way back in 1992, allow the federal government to pick winners and losers by tipping the scales in negotiations that the government has no business distorting. 

"Those rules governing retransmission consent, 'must-carry' obligations and compulsory copyright were created in a bygone era when most television markets were served by a single monopoly cable provider.  Nearly three long decades later, the video market is a very different place.  Today, such alternatives as satellite, internet and alternative cable providers offer a wide array of consumer choices.  Unfortunately, however, federal regulations remain unchanged and don't reflect the tectonic shifts that have occurred in the video market.  What that means is that broadcasters enjoy a bureaucratic advantage during negotiations, which in turn allows them to extract exorbitant retransmission consent fees while retaining the option of invoking must-carry laws.  That prevents the free market from properly functioning in this ever-changing consumer arena, and consumers pay the price. 

"The solution is therefore to remove the federal bureaucracy's finger from the scale, and allow all parties to negotiate in a free market in which neither side enjoys an improper government advantage.  The Next Generation Television Marketplace Act helps accomplish that end by eliminating the outdated retransmission consent scheme, the must-carry obligation and compulsory copyright license and arbitrary broadcast ownership limits in order to let free market cooperation work.  We at CFIF therefore applaud Rep. Scalise's leadership, and urge Congress to pass the Next Generation Television Marketplace Act at long last." 

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