Shocking but necessary perspective on the cost of Chinese theft of U.S. intellectual property (IP) from…
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Image of the Day: The Shocking Cost of Chinese Intellectual Property (IP) Theft

Shocking but necessary perspective on the cost of Chinese theft of U.S. intellectual property (IP) from National Review employing Congressional Research Service numbers:

 

[caption id="" align="alignleft" width="592"] The Shocking Cost of Chinese IP Theft[/caption]

 …[more]

July 14, 2020 • 11:48 AM

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Week of September 18th 2019
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