As the nation debates continuing coronavirus stimulus, AEI offers an eye-opening analysis:  Unemployment…
CFIF on Twitter CFIF on YouTube
Images of the Day: Unemployment Claims Plummeted Faster After $600 Checks Expired

As the nation debates continuing coronavirus stimulus, AEI offers an eye-opening analysis:  Unemployment claims plummeted and the employment picture improved much faster after those $600 checks expired, reestablishing that while we always want to help those who cannot help themselves, government payouts can sometimes reduce incentives and ability to return to the workforce.  And this doesn't even reflect remarkably positive employment reports released by the government since the end dates:

 

[caption id="" align="alignleft" width="562"] Continuing Unemployment Claims Dropped[/caption]

 

 

 

 

[caption id="" align="alignleft" width="563"] Initial Unemployment Claims Dropped[/caption]…[more]

November 12, 2020 • 11:57 AM

Liberty Update

CFIFs latest news, commentary and alerts delivered to your inbox.
Jester's CourtroomLegal tales stranger than stranger than fiction: Ridiculous and sometimes funny lawsuits plaguing our courts.
CFIF Unveils National Survey Highlighting Voters’ Health Care Priorities Ahead of the November Election Print
By CFIF Staff
Wednesday, October 21 2020

ALEXANDRIA, VA – The Center for Individual Freedom (CFIF) today released key findings of a national survey measuring the health care priorities of voters nationally and in 12 key swing states ahead of the November 2020 election.   

The survey, which was conducted by Public Opinion Strategies for CFIF from September 28 – October 5, shows the top issues voters say will determine how they vote for president are coronavirus (36%), economy/jobs (34%), and health insurance costs and coverage (29%). Of the issues tested, those of least importance to this election are prescription drug costs (4%), education (6%) and crime (8%).

Looking specifically at health care, the most important issue for majorities of voters, across party, is addressing the cost of health insurance coverage (55%). High-quality care and services (73%) along with low out-of-pocket costs (64%) are what voters say they value most in health care.

When it comes to addressing those priorities, the survey finds that:

  • Voters, across party, overwhelmingly prefer the role of the federal government to be that of providing oversight and incentives to health care providers, prescription drug companies and health insurers to encourage competition to lower prices in the health care system (70%) rather than having the federal government set prices and determine what services and medicines are covered by private health plans (30%).  

  • Also by overwhelming margins, voters are much more supportive of measures that address specific drivers of health care costs (reducing wasteful spending, capping out-of-pocket costs, providing incentives) rather than putting in place a single government-run health insurance system with one plan that covers all Americans. Seniors, which have the most experience with government-run health coverage, are the most opposed to this approach.

  • Voters’ preference for incentives over government mandates in health care plays out across issues, such as the proposed “Buy American” policy for the medical supply chain. For example, more than six in ten voters (61%) believe the U.S. government should provide more incentives to encourage drug companies to manufacture more of their products in the U.S., rather than requiring drug companies who want to sell their products in the U.S. to entirely source and manufacture them here as well (39%).

“When it comes to health care, it is no surprise that high-quality care and services along with low out-of-pocket costs are what voters care about most,” said CFIF President Jeffrey Mazzella. “The policy preferences of voters in tackling those issues, however, are not those that have dominated recent headlines. Voters prefer focusing on cost drivers that do not impede quality or access and are far less interested in policies that threaten both, such as a Medicare ‘public option’ for all and government price controls.” 

“Most voters, across party, agree that effective spending and incentives would go further in lowering health care costs than single-payer, universal health care,” added Timothy Lee, CFIF’s Senior Vice President of Legal and Public Affairs.  “In fact, seniors—those with the most experience with government-run coverage—were actually the most opposed to a single, government-run health insurance system,” Lee concluded. 

To read the entire Key Findings Memo of the survey results, click here.  View the Executive Summary slide deck below.

Methodology:

Public Opinion Strategies conducted the national online survey among N=1,000 registered voters with an oversample in 12 key general election swing states to reach an N=800 in these states from September 28-October 5, 2020. Key swing states were defined as: AZ, CO, FL, GA, IA, MI, MN, NC, NV, OH, PA, and WI.  The confidence interval for N=1,000 is +/-3.53% and for N=800 is +/-3.95%.

###

Question of the Week   
Thanksgiving was established as an annual event by which of the following presidents?
More Questions
Quote of the Day   
 
Wishing you and yours a safe and Happy Thanksgiving!…[more]
 
 
—The Board of Directors and Staff of CFIF
— The Board of Directors and Staff of CFIF
 
Liberty Poll   

Are you spending more or less on Black Friday and Cyber Monday than you did last year?