In our latest Liberty Update we explain how Texas highlights the peril of the stubborn "green" energy…
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Image of the Day: "Green" Energy Hogs Taxpayer Subsidies

In our latest Liberty Update we explain how Texas highlights the peril of the stubborn "green" energy agenda.  Economist Stephen Moore continues his fantastic work by illustrating how "green" energy, not fossil fuels, irrationally hogs taxpayer subsidies:

[N]ow the left is recirculating its myth that fossil fuels require massive taxpayer subsidies. In psychology, this is called "projecting" - when you accuse someone else of deviant behavior that applies to yourself. In reality for every kilowatt of power generated, wind gets about 10 times more taxpayer subsidies and solar gets 50 to 100 times more handouts than fossil fuels":

 

[caption id="" align="alignleft" width="545"] "Green" Taxpayer Subsidy Hogs[/caption]…[more]

March 01, 2021 • 10:27 AM

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CFIF Urges Opposition to Food Delivery Price Controls in Kansas City Print
By CFIF Staff
Monday, January 25 2021

January 25, 2021  

Councilwoman Katheryn Shields
Chair
Finance, Governance & Public Safety Committee
City Council, City of Kansas City
414 E. 12th Street
Kansas City, MO 64106 
 
Re:  Opposition to Ordinance No. 210054 Price Controls Over Food Delivery Businesses 
 
Dear Councilwoman Shields:  
 
On behalf of the Center for Individual Freedom (CFIF) and over 300,000 supporters and activists across the state of Missouri and the rest of the nation, I write regarding an issue of great importance:  Ordinance No. 210054, which would enact a price control of 15% on vital food delivery businesses.  
 
Even during stable and growing economic times, among government’s most important responsibilities is ensuring a public policy climate that enables new and small businesses to succeed, particularly by keeping regulatory barriers low.  That becomes even more critical amid difficult economic times such as these.  
 
The proposed ordinance at issue would contravene that duty by creating a patchwork price control scheme over contracts between private third-party delivery platforms and restaurants.  That would not only violate the bargained-for terms of voluntary contracts that businesses enter with third-party platforms, it would make food delivery less accessible to customers, and it would reduce earning opportunities for Missouri delivery drivers who have relied on these platforms for additional income during the pandemic.  
 
While the restaurant industry has been affected to a devastating degree during the public health emergency, third-party delivery platforms have served as an invaluable aid to many struggling businesses while cities have limited or shut down dining options for consumers.  While some restaurants may choose to offer these services themselves, many have relied on third party platforms to offer solutions and resources that would normally require enormous capital.  Those platforms, such as DoorDash, UberEats, GrubHub and others, have used commission fees from their contracts to cover costs such as insurance, background checks, marketing and advertising that restaurants would otherwise have to pay themselves.  
 
What these platforms provide local business should not be disregarded or penalized with heavy-handed price controls.  They offer critical access points and opportunities for millions of customers, online ordering technology workers, credit card processing businesses, marketing personnel and delivery couriers.  Unfortunately, some restaurants now want those third-party delivery services to continue for their own benefit, but without paying the adequate costs for the services provided.  
 
Exacerbating matters, these types of commission cap ordinances disproportionately affect smaller restaurants.  That’s because third-party delivery services often must prioritize larger restaurants that bring in more business and have higher subtotals.  Additionally, a proposed cap of 15% on freely negotiated contracts would provide little to no ability to cover costs absent consumer price increases.  That could in turn lead to fewer orders and less revenue for restaurants, higher prices for consumers, reduced service areas and fewer earning opportunities for struggling delivery couriers.  
 
While it’s certainly true the restaurant sector continues to suffer due to the pandemic and public health orders, suddenly imposing price controls upon delivery services would only harm them further by limiting the options available to them.  The trickle-down effect of these price controls would harm not just the small businesses and restaurants that use these platforms, but also the delivery workers, and ultimately, the consumers who rely on the services as well.  
 
What restaurants and delivery drivers alike need during this stressful economic period is stability, not sudden further disruption.  Many delivery workers deliver food as part-time opportunities to earn supplement income, and overwhelmingly rely upon flexible schedules that meet their economic, personal and family needs.  
 
City leaders should accordingly seek opportunities that support the entire economic chain driving communities each and every day, not artificially favor one type of enterprise over another.  Price controls such as the proposed ordinance would have more unintended consequences that cannot be mitigated during an already tumultuous economic time.  
 
Thank you for your consideration, and we welcome further productive discussion on this important issue.  
 
Sincerely,
/s/  
Jeffrey Mazzella
President
 
cc: All Members, Finance, Governance & Public Safety Committee
        Councilman Eric Bunch
 
Question of the Week   
Which one of the following states had the first paved concrete street in the U.S.?
More Questions
Quote of the Day   
 
"We have a lost generation of kids who have neither the education nor the trained skills to succeed in society.As teachers' unions fight to keep schools closed, the true cost is being felt by students who are racking up failing grades, dropping out of virtual classes, increasing drug use, and, in rising numbers, committing suicide.Watching this happen to the public schools has been particularly hard…[more]
 
 
—Jonathan Turley, George Washington University Shapiro Professor of Public Interest Law and Practicing Criminal Defense Attorney
— Jonathan Turley, George Washington University Shapiro Professor of Public Interest Law and Practicing Criminal Defense Attorney
 
Liberty Poll   

Do you support the $1.9 trillion Covid aid bill in its current form to get money to those who need it or oppose because of all the non-critical provisions in it?