This week marks the 40th anniversary of the Staggers Rail Act of 1980, which deregulated American freight…
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Happy 40th to the Staggers Rail Act, Which Deregulated and Saved the U.S. Rail Industry

This week marks the 40th anniversary of the Staggers Rail Act of 1980, which deregulated American freight rail and saved it from looming oblivion.

At the time of passage, the U.S. economy muddled along amid ongoing malaise, and our rail industry teetered due to decades of overly bureaucratic sclerosis.  Many other domestic U.S. industries had disappeared, and our railroads faced the same fate.  But by passing the Staggers Rail Act, Congress restored a deregulatory approach that in the 1980s allowed other U.S. industries to thrive.  No longer would government determine what services railroads could offer, their rates or their routes, instead restoring greater authority to the railroads themselves based upon cost-efficiency.

Today, U.S. rail flourishes even amid the coronavirus pandemic…[more]

October 13, 2020 • 11:09 PM

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Jester's CourtroomLegal tales stranger than stranger than fiction: Ridiculous and sometimes funny lawsuits plaguing our courts.
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Thursday, August 21 2014

Nearly two years after a police stop and citation that made national news, a grandmother is suing a Dallas-area police officer and city for allegedly being "antagonized and assaulted."

According to news reports, on August 19, 2012, then 77-year-old grandmother Lynn Bedford was stopped for going 66 mpg in a 50-mph zone.  Citing a bladder infection and the need to use a restroom, Bedford refused to get out of the car or hand over her driver's license, prompting Sgt. Gene Geheb to open the door and remove Bedford from the car. Bedford ultimately received two citations: one for speeding and another for failing to provide ID.

Originally, Bedford said she did not have plans to sue.  Now, two years later, she has changed her mind and is seeking a jury trial and damages against the City of Keene and Sgt. Geheb for, among other things, unreasonable search and seizure and for having in place policies that show “deliberate indifference to the constitutional rights of citizens.” In the federal lawsuit filed in Dallas, Bedford claims she “suffered a painfully-bruised tailbone, bruising on her arm, and a sore shoulder.”
 
In September 2012, Keene Chief Rocky Alberti defended his officer’s actions: “The incident has been reviewed thoroughly by the Keene Police Department and the City of Keene administration,” Alberti said. “All parties have concluded that Sgt. Geheb did not violate any state laws or department policies, and in fact was following department policy in regards to violators not providing information.”

Source: Dallasnews.com

Question of the Week   
Currently, U.S. Daylight Saving Time ends annually on which of the following?
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—Michael Goodwin, New York Post
— Michael Goodwin, New York Post
 
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