The U.S. travel technology firm Sabre may not ring an immediate bell, and perhaps you’ve not yet heard…
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On Sabre/Farelogix Merger, DOJ Mustn’t Undertake a Misguided Antitrust Boondoggle

The U.S. travel technology firm Sabre may not ring an immediate bell, and perhaps you’ve not yet heard of its proposed acquisition of Farelogix, but it looms as one of the most important antitrust cases to approach trial since AT&T/Time-Warner. The transaction’s most significant aspect is the way in which it offers a perfect illustration of overzealous bureaucratic antitrust enforcement, and the way that can delay and also punish American consumers. Specifically, the transaction enhances rather than inhibits market competition, and will benefit both travelers and the travel industry by accelerating innovation.  That’s in part because Sabre and Farelogix aren’t head-to-head market competitors, but rather complementary businesses.  While Sabre serves customers throughout the…[more]

January 13, 2020 • 03:53 pm

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Jester's CourtroomLegal tales stranger than stranger than fiction: Ridiculous and sometimes funny lawsuits plaguing our courts.
Jester’s Courtroom
Watch Your Step
Thursday, January 16 2020

A New York man is suing Westchester County Airport seeking $5 million in damages after he tripped over a luggage scale.

According to news reports, Ralph Faga was visiting the airport to purchase a plane ticket when, after being told the prices for the trip were higher than what he saw online, he was invited to the agent's side of the counter to view ticket prices on the computer screen. As Faga was coming around the corner, he allegedly tripped over a luggage scale he did not see, suffering a torn rotator cuff and bicep tendon, which reportedly is inoperable.

Faga charges that the airport staff was negligent and the scale was not properly marked for visibility. According to Faga’s attorney, his injuries are permanent and will change his lifestyle significantly, which is why Faga is now seeking such a high settlement.

Source: travelandleisure.com

A Doggone Huge Lawsuit
Wednesday, January 08 2020

A New York man is suing a local animal shelter for $5 million, claiming the shelter wrongly adopted out his dog, Eto, a Belgian Malinois.

Clifton Benjamin, a TSA canine handler, claims he purchased Eto in the Netherlands and brought him to the United States. The day after one-year old Eto went missing, he turned up at the Town of Islip animal shelter, where Benjamin went to pick him up. According to news reports, Benjamin claimed to have all the pedigree information for the dog, including his pet passport, vaccination records and shipping/tracking information.

Belgian Malinois are often trained for use by U.S. Secret Service members and for tracking and security and have been known to be sold for between $20,000 and $40,000.

"This is the equivalent of finding a Ferrari at a used car dealership," Benjamin's attorney, Vesselin Mitev, of Ray, Mitev & Associates, LLP, said. "The outrageous behavior of those sworn to reunite animals with their owners cannot go unpunished. We must find Eto. We know he is out there and we demand him back."

In a statement, a town spokesperson said that several people came to claim the dog but none could prove ownership.

"The plaintiff had no physical paperwork in his name, and what he did have, included inaccurate information including a chip number that did not match the chip number in the dog," the statement reads. "The plaintiff admitted to giving the dog to a third party. The dog was brought in on September 14th, 2018 and adopted on October 5, 2018. We received several inquiries. We did more than our due diligence in looking for a responsible owner. The dog was ultimately adopted out to a retired NYC police officer with no relationship to the Town of Islip. This is a frivolous lawsuit and will be vigorously defended by the Town of Islip."

Source: patch.com

Taking a Bite Out of Alligator Product Sales
Wednesday, December 18 2019

The state of Louisiana is suing the state of California over its decision to ban the import and sale of alligator products.

In its recent lawsuit, Louisiana is alleging that California's ban will hurt the alligator products market, a vital part of Louisiana's economy, in addition to the marshlands that serve as habitat for the alligators and are preserved for raising them. The state argues that if California's ban goes into effect, “landowners will be forced to greatly reduce or cease their erosion control efforts because they will be unable to economically sustain those efforts, resulting in irreparable harm to their property as well as harm to Louisiana’s sovereign environmental interests in wetland preservation."

According to news reports, California banned alligator skins and meats in the 1970s but repeatedly has issued exceptions that allowed sales; the most recent exemption, scheduled to expire January 1, has not been renewed, prompting the lawsuit. The alligator ban was backed by a coalition of environmental and animal rights groups.

“California has nevertheless attempted to destroy the market for American alligator products notwithstanding the fact that no such alligators live in California," the lawsuit says.

According to Louisiana Wildlife & Fisheries, over 300,000 alligators are harvested every year from both farm and wild sources.

Source: journalstar.com

Searching for the Lost Treasure in Court
Wednesday, December 11 2019

A Colorado man is suing a book author, claiming he was duped by the author's poem that contained clues to a lost treasure chest.

David Harold Hanson of Colorado Springs, Colorado, sued Forrest Fenn in U.S. District Court. Hanson is seeking $1.5 million, claiming Fenn deprived him of the treasure "by fraudulent statements." According to news reports, Fenn proffered a 24-line poem in his autobiography, "The Thrill of the Chase", that allegedly holds clues to the location of a treasure chest hidden in the Rocky Mountains. It's been reported that an estimated 350,000 people have gone in search of the treasure.

Hanson claims he followed the clues and arrived at the location where the hidden items were, but only after Fenn first issued "misleading clues" that led Hanson away from the the search area and then issued "additional clues" that benefitted someone else who "found the items in question."

Fenn, an 89-year-old Vietnam War veteran, says he hid a chest full of valuable goods in the wilderness in an effort to get people outdoors.

The search for Fenn’s treasure has spawned an annual Fennboree gathering of campers at Hyde Memorial State Park, at least two documentary films and hundreds of newspaper and magazine articles.

Fenn told news sources he was unaware of the lawsuit and has “received no correspondence from him [Hanson] that I know of.” He said the treasure remains where he hid it ten years ago.

Hanson said in his complaint that he came up with the $1.5 million figure because it is half of the lowest publicized amount of the value of the treasure chest’s belongings — $3 million.

He said once the real amount is discovered, “said sum may be significantly adjusted.”

Source: Santafenewmexican.com

Have It Your Way... Just Not On the Same Grill
Wednesday, December 04 2019

A man who states he is a vegan is suing Burger King because the meatless Impossible Burger he purchased was cooked on the same grill as meat products.

In a class action lawsuit filed in the Southern District of Florida, plaintiff Phillip Williams claims the burger chain advertises its vegan option as meat-free, but it is contaminated by meat by-product left on the grill. Williams is accusing Burger King of false advertising - the Impossible Burger is touted as "100% Whopper, 0% Beef" - and benefiting monetarily from offering a vegan option that is not vegan.

According to Burger King's website, "guests looking for a meat-free option, a non-broiler method of preparation is available upon request."

Williams claims the drive-thru he visited in the Atlanta area did not note that the burger would be cooked alongside those containing meat and that if he had known he would not have bought it.

Williams claims he "suffered monetary damages in the amount that he paid to purchase" the Impossible Whopper.

Source: CNN.com



Question of the Week   
Which one of the following was the first African-American soloist to appear at the Metropolitan Opera House in New York City?
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Quote of the Day   
 
"If there were such egregious misconduct that the public was convinced of the need to remove Trump, such that two-thirds of the Senate would ignore partisan ties and do just that, there would be no partisan stunts. Democratic leaders would have worked cooperatively with their GOP counterparts, as was done in prior impeachments. They would have told the president: 'Sure, you can have your lawyers here…[more]
 
 
—Andrew C. McCarthy, National Review
— Andrew C. McCarthy, National Review
 
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Should witnesses be called for the Senate impeachment trial, which could take weeks or even months, or be restricted to the record and evidence already produced by the House?