There's a destructive campaign underway to encourage government confiscation of patents from pharmaceutical…
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Image of the Day: Private Pharma Investment Dwarfs Federal NIH Funding

There's a destructive campaign underway to encourage government confiscation of patents from pharmaceutical innovators and dictate the price for Remdesivir and other drugs.  That's a terrible and counterproductive policy under any circumstance, but particularly now that private drug innovators are already hacking away at the coronavirus.  In that vein, this helpful image illustrates the vast disparity between private investment and National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding that some seem to think justifies patent confiscation, price controls or other big-government schemes:

[caption id="" align="aligncenter" width="549"] Private Investment Dwarfs NIH Funding[/caption]…[more]

June 03, 2020 • 10:16 AM

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Jester's CourtroomLegal tales stranger than stranger than fiction: Ridiculous and sometimes funny lawsuits plaguing our courts.
Liberty v. Lockdowns
By Betsy McCaughey
Wednesday, May 20 2020
Citing the Bill of Rights and the "ideals of civil disobedience," the owner of Atilis Gym in Bellmawr, New Jersey, defied Governor Phil Murphy's orders by reopening on Monday. Cops "formally" notified the gym owner he was in violation of the shutdown order and then wished him "a good day." The crowd cheered. Civil disobedience is alive and well, even in this pandemic. Americans are not sheep. Last week, a Texas judge told salon owner Shelley Luther if she disagreed with Dallas's lockdown rules, she should "hire a lawyer" and sue. Sorry, but most working…
 
Across the Wide, Growing American Divide
Red- and blue-state America was already divided before the coronavirus epidemic hit. Globalization had…
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Jeff Sessions Defends Himself, but Stays Loyal To the President
It hasn't been in the news much, but former Attorney General Jeff Sessions, now in a tight Republican…
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Obamagate Is Not a Conspiracy Theory
Those sharing #Obamagate on Twitter would do best to avoid the hysterics we saw from Russian-collusion…
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Congress Must Act to Protect Business Against Looming Lawsuit Threat
As America struggles to regain its footing, employers large and small face a potentially harrowing dilemma. …
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What We Still Don't Know About the Michael Flynn Case
The Michael Flynn case will soon be over. It began on Jan. 24, 2017, just four days into the Trump administration…
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Time to Reopen the Economy
 All across the nation, business owners are waiting for the signal to reopen. In some places, it's…
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Losing Our Fears, In War and Plague
Seventy-five years ago this month, Germany surrendered, ending the European theater of World War II.…
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Coalition Urges Against Denying Patents, Exclusivity and Property Rights to Biomedical Innovators
In a letter to Congress, CFIF joined with a large coalition on a letter expressing “strong opposition…
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Don’t Let Congressional Liberals Undermine Patent Rights Amid Coronavirus Fight
To better appreciate the towering leadership role that America’s pharmaceutical sector plays in…
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Biden's Disgraceful Hypocrisy on Sexual Misconduct
If presumptive Democratic Party presidential nominee Joe Biden were forced to live by the standards he…
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Question of the Week   
What was the codename for D-Day, June 6, 1944?
More Questions
Quote of the Day   
 
"One could be forgiven amidst the protests and continuing coronavirus crisis for forgetting that in Washington, DC, this week, Congress is looking into serious allegations that Barack Obama's Department of Justice was spying on the Trump campaign. In normal times, it would be the biggest news story in America, and Wednesday's shocking admissions by former Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein would…[more]
 
 
—David Marcus, New York Post
— David Marcus, New York Post
 
Liberty Poll   

Until this week, the U.S. House has required Members to be physically present to vote. Due to coronavirus, "proxy voting," allowing Members to cast votes for absent colleagues, is now being used. Should "proxy voting" be allowed to continue?