We've recently highlighted how right-to-work states, which the Biden Administration and Congressional…
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Amazon Workers Soundly Reject Unionization, and NR's Kevin Williamson Highlights Another Great Reason Why: Big-Labor Corruption

We've recently highlighted how right-to-work states, which the Biden Administration and Congressional leftists hope to abolish, dramatically outperform forced-union states in terms of job growth, manufacturing and household consumption.  Worker freedom from Big Labor bosses is a leading reason why in a high-profile vote, Amazon workers in Alabama voted to reject unionization by a 71% to 29% margin last week.

In a phenomenal new piece, National Review's Kevin Williamson offers another reason for rejecting unionization that we mustn't ignore:  big labor bosses' widespread corruption.  Williamson lists a litany of union officials convicted and sentenced for embezzlement and other misuse of members' hard-earned dues - in 2020 alone.  Accordingly, the leftist anti-capitalist drumbeat…[more]

April 12, 2021 • 01:05 PM

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Home Jester's Courtroom The Kindle Ate My Homework
The Kindle Ate My Homework Print
Thursday, August 20 2009

It used to be that the most popular excuse for missing homework was that “the dog ate it.” Not so if you are Justin Gawronski, a 17-year-old Michigan high school senior. Gawronski is blaming Amazon for losing his homework after the company wirelessly deleted a copy of George Orwell's “1984” from Gawronski's Kindle, deleting along with it the notes he had taken on the device for his homework.

According to the complaint filed in a federal class action lawsuit in Seattle: “As part of his studies of '1984,' Mr. Gawronski had made copious notes in the book. After Amazon remotely deleted '1984,' those notes were rendered useless because they no longer referenced the relevant parts of the book. The notes are still accessible on the Kindle 2 device in a file separate from the deleted book, but are of no value. For example, a note such as 'remember this paragraph for your thesis' is useless if it does not actually reference a specific paragraph. By deleting '1984' from Mr. Gawronski's Kindle 2, this is the position in which Amazon left him. Mr. Gawronski now needs to recreate all of his studies.”

Gawronski seeks to prevent Amazon from again deleting books from Kindles. Gawronski also seeks monetary relief for his lost work. He filed the lawsuit, he said, because he wants to “help set a precedent so that Amazon doesn't do this again” and to help move the industry forward. “When you think that you own something and don't own it – that's not how it should be,” he said.

According to news sources, the Amazon Kindle Terms of Service shows that Amazon has the right to do what they will with the books: “You acknowledge that the sale of the Device to you does not transfer to you title to or ownership of any intellectual property rights of Amazon or its suppliers. All of the Software is licensed, not sold, and such license is non-exclusive…Amazon reserves the right to modify, suspend, or discontinue the Service at any time, and Amazon will not be liable to you should it exercise such right.”

—Source: WSJ.com

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"Democrats may well follow through on threats to add four new Justices to the Supreme Court -- though they have only three seats to spare in the House and a 50-50 tie in the Senate broken by Vice President Kamala Harris. But when Republicans inevitably retake the presidency and Congress they will retaliate by increasing the Supreme Court by another four or five Justices. Soon the Court will become…[more]
 
 
—John Yoo, University of California Professor of Law, Hoover Institution Visiting Fellow and AEI Visiting Scholar
— John Yoo, University of California Professor of Law, Hoover Institution Visiting Fellow and AEI Visiting Scholar
 
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