In our latest Liberty Update, we highlight the benefits of the Trump Administration's deregulation effort…
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Poll: Americans Overwhelmingly Agree with Trump's Pandemic Deregulation Initiative

In our latest Liberty Update, we highlight the benefits of the Trump Administration's deregulation effort, both pre-pandemic and going forward, and how a budding effort among Congressional leftists to impose a moratorium on business mergers would severely undermine that effort.  Rasmussen Reports brings excellent news in that regard, as large majorities of Americans agree with Trump rather than hyper-regulatory leftists:

The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey shows that 58% of likely U.S. voters approve of Trump's decision to temporarily limit government regulation of small businesses to help them bounce back.  Just 26% are opposed, while 17% are undecided."

Sadly but perhaps predictably, those on the left stubbornly disagree:

The president's action has triggered…[more]

May 26, 2020 • 12:43 PM

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Jester's CourtroomLegal tales stranger than stranger than fiction: Ridiculous and sometimes funny lawsuits plaguing our courts.
Loser Pays Print
Wednesday, June 05 2019

The Arizona Supreme Court has upheld a lower court's ruling requiring a Phoenix law firm to pay nearly $150,000 in legal fees over what the lower court concluded was unfounded litigation.

According to news reports, Statecraft LLC filed a lawsuit against the town of Snowflake and Copperstate Farms, a limited liability company that had received a special use permit from the municipality to grow marijuana in an existing greenhouse. Several residents, represented by Statecraft, filed suit, alleging, among other things, "illegal contract zoning."

Lower court Judge Donna Grimsley dismissed the case and ordered Statecraft to pay the legal fees roughly $40,000 to the town and $109,000 to Cooperstate. The appellate court upheld the decision, finding there was more than enough evidence the lawsuit should never have been filed.

"There is no public interest in a frivolous lawsuit, and discouraging groundless litigation is what the legislature intended," the appellate court concluded. Without comment, the Arizona Supreme Court declined to review the ruling.

Kory Langhofer, a Statecraft attorney, maintains the trial judge "simply got it wrong," warning of the implications of the Supreme Court's decision to leave the lower ruling intact, saying it "will inevitably chill thoughtful cases of first impression in Arizona courts."

Source: tucson.com

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Quote of the Day   
 
"Our governmental COVID-19 mitigation policy of broad societal lockdown focuses on containing the spread of the disease at all costs, instead of 'flattening the curve' and preventing hospital overcrowding. Although well-intentioned, the lockdown was imposed without consideration of its consequences beyond those directly from the pandemic. ...The lost economic output in the U.S. alone is estimated…[more]
 
 
—Scott W. Atlas, MD, Hoover Institution Senior Fellow; John R. Birge University of Chicago Booth School of Business Professor; Ralph L. Keeney, Duke University Professor Emeritus and University of Southern California; Alexander Lipton, Jerusalem Business School of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem Visiting Professor and Dean's Fellow
— Scott W. Atlas, MD, Hoover Institution Senior Fellow; John R. Birge University of Chicago Booth School of Business Professor; Ralph L. Keeney, Duke University Professor Emeritus and University of Southern California; Alexander Lipton, Jerusalem Business School of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem Visiting Professor and Dean's Fellow
 
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