There's a destructive campaign underway to encourage government confiscation of patents from pharmaceutical…
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Image of the Day: Private Pharma Investment Dwarfs Federal NIH Funding

There's a destructive campaign underway to encourage government confiscation of patents from pharmaceutical innovators and dictate the price for Remdesivir and other drugs.  That's a terrible and counterproductive policy under any circumstance, but particularly now that private drug innovators are already hacking away at the coronavirus.  In that vein, this helpful image illustrates the vast disparity between private investment and National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding that some seem to think justifies patent confiscation, price controls or other big-government schemes:

[caption id="" align="aligncenter" width="549"] Private Investment Dwarfs NIH Funding[/caption]…[more]

June 03, 2020 • 10:16 AM

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Jester's CourtroomLegal tales stranger than stranger than fiction: Ridiculous and sometimes funny lawsuits plaguing our courts.
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A Swing and a Miss Print
Wednesday, May 13 2020

A Connecticut town is suing its own board of appeals and a local cancer charity over brick pavers.

According to news reports, John Ellis, a former Major League Baseball player, created the nonprofit Connecticut Cancer Foundation to provide economic assistance and financial aid to cancer patients and their families. As part of the construction of the facility, a local landscaping company donated $35,000 in materials and labor to install a baseball diamond-shaped patio that features bricks engraved with names of those battling cancer.

In the original plans, the diamond was supposed to be grass. The foundation asked for, but was denied, a special exception because the pavers did not meet the zoning commission's regulations.

"They do not consider it landscaping, that’s part of the problem. So, grass is landscaping, pavers are not," said Jane Ellis, the foundation’s executive director.

The foundation appealed the zoning commission’s decision to the Zoning Board of Appeals and a special exception was granted. Yet, the city claims the board did not have the authority to give the approval.

"Now the town, the zoning commission, is suing their own board of appeals and a charity for pavers," Ellis said. She said the commission is telling them to dig the bricks up and remove them.

"I am not afraid of a little fight, and this is minor to me compared to the families that I see all the time and the children battling cancer. This is ridiculous, and I feel sorry for these people who voted no. I really do… And I was really hopeful that the five people sitting on that commission…if they had ever experienced cancer, or knows someone who has gone through this battle, that I didn’t understand how they could not vote to approve. I really was so disheartened when they decided 4-1 to deny," Ellis added.

Source: wtnh.com

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"One could be forgiven amidst the protests and continuing coronavirus crisis for forgetting that in Washington, DC, this week, Congress is looking into serious allegations that Barack Obama's Department of Justice was spying on the Trump campaign. In normal times, it would be the biggest news story in America, and Wednesday's shocking admissions by former Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein would…[more]
 
 
—David Marcus, New York Post
— David Marcus, New York Post
 
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