In what sometimes seems like an era of constantly expanding government and demonization of free markets…
CFIF on Twitter CFIF on YouTube
Image of the Day: Americans Remain Highly Positive Toward Free Enterprise and Business Over Government

In what sometimes seems like an era of constantly expanding government and demonization of free markets, a recent Gallup poll offers refreshing news - Americans overwhelmingly view free markets positively, especially relative to the federal government:

[caption id="" align="alignleft" width="961"] Free Markets > Federal Government[/caption]

Political candidates would be wise to emphasize this in an election year 2022, and elected leaders would be wise to translate Americans' preference into concrete action.

 …[more]

January 24, 2022 • 12:44 PM

Liberty Update

CFIFs latest news, commentary and alerts delivered to your inbox.
Home Press Room CFIF Comment to FCC: Encouraging More Private Sector Investment Must Be Focus of National Broadband Policy
CFIF Comment to FCC: Encouraging More Private Sector Investment Must Be Focus of National Broadband Policy Print
Tuesday, June 09 2009

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 9, 2009

ALEXANDRIA, VA – In a comment filed this week before the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), the Center for Individual Freedom (CFIF) insisted that encouraging private sector investment, rather than imposing counterproductive regulations, must be the focus of a new national broadband policy.

CFIF filed its comment in response to the FCC’s April 8, 2009 Notice of Inquiry, which itself stems from the American Investment and Recovery Act of 2009. As part of that legislation, Congress directed the FCC to devise a national plan to achieve nationwide broadband access.

“Since the 1996 Telecommunications Act, the Internet has thrived and played a central role in maintaining America’s status as the most prosperous, most entrepreneurial and most innovative nation in human history,” said Timothy Lee, CFIF’s Director of Legal and Public Affairs. “This didn’t happen by accident or coincidence,” he added. “Rather, it has occurred precisely because the government has refrained from suffocating it with bureaucratic overregulation.”

In its comment, CFIF affirms the following principles:

  • Universal broadband access is a noble goal. The past two decades have witnessed incredible technological and Internet growth, but much work remains. This is precisely why the FCC’s effort to commence a public/private campaign to achieve 100% broadband access is so important.

  • The FCC’s National Broadband Plan focus must be on policies that actually work, rather than accommodating special interests. Although the FCC’s campaign can trigger progress in achieving universal broadband access, well-meaning but ill-advised policies will only slow current progress and create wholly new barriers. The FCC must therefore ascertain and encourage those efforts that have worked to date, rather than unravel them.

  • Private investment will be the primary engine to achieve the FCC’s broadband goals. Since the 1996 Telecommunications Act, the Internet has progressed from a novel idea to a central aspect of American life and prosperity. And how did this occur? Primarily through private investment. Since 1996, the cable and telecommunications sector has invested $147 billion in infrastructure development. In 2008, the industry invested at least $15 billion, and expects to invest an even larger amount this year.

  • New regulations that impair private investment will only subvert the FCC’s broadband efforts. Although some insist upon massive regulation of the cable and telecommunication industry, the reality is that America possesses the largest broadband network in the world, and leads the world by many objective measures. Those who contend otherwise and advocate overregulation of the cable and telecommunications sector typically cite defective data to advance their agenda.

  • Additional investment is critical to achieving universal broadband access. The FCC must partner with private investors to achieve universal broadband access. If national broadband policy focuses upon incentivizing private investment in broadband, and enabling network providers to manage their own networks based upon market demands, skeptical consumers can be convinced of the value of broadband, and develop a sense that their connections are safe, secure and high-quality.

“The bottom line is that universal broadband access will be accomplished by encouraging the private investments that have achieved such breathtaking progress in just over one decade, not by imposing counterproductive overregulation,” Mr. Lee concluded.

Click here to read the full text of CFIF’s comment to the FCC.

Related Articles :
Quiz Question   
In what year did Congress pass a law that requires voter identification to register to vote in federal elections?
More Questions
Notable Quote   
 
"By so many measures, Joe Biden's presidential administration falls at the bottom of the scale. But there is one metric by which Biden is tops -- in fact, the very tops in all of history. That is the regulatory costs his administration has imposed on the nation in a single year.The American Action Forum, a conservative think tank that tracks government regulation, has tallied up what government agencies…[more]
 
 
—The Editors, Washington Examiner
— The Editors, Washington Examiner
 
Liberty Poll   

Given all the controversies, how interested are you in watching the Beijing Winter Olympics?