The lazy assumption that America suffers a uniquely high mass shooting rate is the foundation upon which…
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Fact of the Day: Mass Shootings More Common in Europe Than the U.S.

The lazy assumption that America suffers a uniquely high mass shooting rate is the foundation upon which 2nd Amendment restrictionists must rely.

After all, if allegedly more "enlightened" nations like France or Norway that effectively prohibit so-called "assault weapons" (a meaningless slur, but that's another subject entirely) suffer a mass shooting rate as high or higher than the U.S., then their rationale for restricting law-abiding citizens' right to keep and bear arms collapses.

Unfortunately for them, as illustrated by crimeresearch.org, that's precisely what the real-world facts show.  France, Norway  and other European nations actually suffer higher mass shooting rates than the U.S.  In fact, out of 18 European and North American nations measured, the U.S. mass shooting rate…[more]

June 28, 2016 • 12:55 pm

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A 17-Year-Old's Letter to President Obama about Football Print
By Nick Bookout
Wednesday, January 30 2013

Dear President Obama:
 
I am a 17-year old high school senior who has proudly played football for 11 years. I read with great dismay your recent comments in The New Republic in which you state that you would have to “think long and hard” before allowing a son to play football. With all due respect, I couldn’t sit quietly on the sidelines as your comments kicked off a national debate. 
 
Without a doubt, football is a dangerous game and I agree that it is even more so at the college and professional levels. More concerning about your comments, however, is the trickle down effect they will have on the sport at other levels, including youth and high school, where the number of kids who suffer serious injuries compares to those playing other sports. 
 
Overregulation and parental concern could sideline many young players who could gain a lot from the experience. Thankfully, my parents, one of whom is an orthopedic surgeon, did not deny me this opportunity.
 
Football taught me that you could achieve almost anything through hard work and dedication. You don’t have to be the biggest, strongest, fastest or best player, but you do have to be the hardest working player, both on and off the field.
 
Football taught me accountability. In football, you’re accountable to your coaches, your teammates, and yourself. If you do this, you show that you can be trusted and you can become a role model for younger kids in the community.
 
Football is a bond that will forever tie me to my teammates and community. I have 50 men I can call brothers, and football brought together people in the community of different ages, color and socioeconomic status every Friday night to cheer us on. 
 
Football taught me how to be a leader. By observing my coaches and former teammates, I witnessed what it takes to be a leader. As Dwight Eisenhower once said, “The supreme quality for leadership is unquestionably integrity. Without it, no real success is possible, no matter whether it is on a section gang, a football field, in an army, or in an office.”
 
Football taught me that a key ingredient to athletic success is to work hard in the classroom; football made me a better student and academics made me a better football player. For a student-athlete to reach the pinnacle, it takes discipline, time management, passion and commitment.  It also takes sacrifice. The determination that led me to excel in sports helped me to succeed in the classroom and will help me succeed in life. 
 
My most rewarding memories involve football and I am forever grateful to my teammates, coaches and the game of football for these memories, which go way beyond touchdowns and Friday nights. For these reasons, and others, football is far more than a game; it is a lesson in tradition, teamwork, academic commitment and perseverance. 
 
I would hate for anyone to be denied the lessons I’ve learned playing football. My sincere hope is that experiences such as mine will be taken into consideration if and when changes are made to the sport.


Nick Bookout is a senior at Gulf Breeze High School (FL), captain of his varsity football and basketball teams, and a National Merit Semifinalist.  Bookout is the son of CFIF corporate counsel Renee Giachino.

Question of the Week   
Which one of the following incumbent First Ladies was the first to officially address party delegates at the Democratic or Republican National Conventions?
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Quote of the Day   
 
"After a more than two-year investigation into the 2012 terrorist attack in Benghazi, House Republicans are set to release a lengthy report Tuesday recounting the events that led to the deaths of four American diplomats. ... The report highlights the military's failure to carry out Defense Secretary Leon Panetta's order to deploy forces to Benghazi and the lengthy delay that prevented the military…[more]
 
 
—Andrea Mitchell, Alex Moe and Abigail Williams, NBC News
— Andrea Mitchell, Alex Moe and Abigail Williams, NBC News
 
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While the UK’s vote to exit the European Union will produce a period of global economic and political turmoil, does it make you feel more optimistic or more pessimistic about the long-term future?