So after just one year of tax-cutting and deregulation under the Trump Administration, the Congressional…
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Image of the Day: Job Growth Estimate Boosted

So after just one year of tax-cutting and deregulation under the Trump Administration, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) has revised its estimate of job growth over the next decade upward by over 2.5 million new jobs.  As they say in the legal field, "res ipsa loquitur" - "the fact speaks for itself."

. [caption id="" align="alignleft" width="325" caption="Upward Job Growth Estimate"][/caption]

.…[more]

April 18, 2018 • 09:53 am

Liberty Update

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Jester's CourtroomLegal tales stranger than stranger than fiction: Ridiculous and sometimes funny lawsuits plaguing our courts.
Notable Quotes
 
On the Importation of Affordable Prescriptions From Abroad:
 
 

"Americans are well aware and focused on the need to protect our Southern border. But little thought has been given to the need to protect the border with Canada. ...

An enormous, robust, and illegal opioid drug supply is streaming across our border with Canada, killing and poisoning tens of thousands of our citizens each year. Just last month, Canadian authorities busted a huge smuggling ring headquartered in Calgary that was producing an astonishing amount of counterfeit pharmaceutical drugs -- 120,000 pills a day. That's nearly 160 million pills a year from just one source!

Canada has become a pipeline for the smuggling of Canadian fentanyl, a drug that is intentionally made to look identical to the legal Oxycodone, and which is more than 100 times more potent than morphine. Responsible for more than 50 percent of the more than 20,000 deaths of Americans from opioid-related drugs in 2016, fentanyl has become a major killer in the U.S. And 2018 will undoubtedly prove much worse. Sadly, Congress and its policy leaders in Washington remain silent, totally unconcerned, refusing to hold the Canadian government responsible, while thousands more Americans die each year.

Currently, Congress is debating whether to legalize the importation of modified or newly reformulated pharmaceutical drugs. They would soon be released upon an unsuspecting U.S. population under the guise of affordable prescriptions from abroad, but in many cases they could in fact be deadly counterfeits."

Read entire article here.

 
 
— Maria Espinoza, Remembrance Project National Director
— Maria Espinoza, Remembrance Project National Director
Posted April 20, 2018 • 08:02 am
 
 
On the Outrageous Public Identification of Sean Hannity as Michael Cohen's Client:
 
 

"In yesterday's column, I contended that it was outrageous for federal district judge Kimba Wood to direct that talk-radio and Fox News host Sean Hannity be publicly identified as Michael Cohen's third client. ...

"The court's order that Hannity's name be disclosed in open court violated longstanding, judicially endorsed standards against identifying uncharged persons in legal proceedings attendant to criminal investigations.

"Forget about evidence of wrongdoing. There is not even a suggestion that Hannity is involved in any crimes. He is a longtime friend of Cohen's. He says they've had some informal legal discussions about such matters as real estate -- and as any lawyer will tell you, informal discussions with non-lawyer friends are common. Hannity insists, however, that he has never retained Cohen to represent him in any legal matter, and has never paid him or received an invoice from him. There is no public evidence to contradict this, and no suggestion that Cohen has previously represented himself as Hannity's attorney.

"There has been no intimation that Hannity has any pertinent information about the activities for which Cohen is under investigation. His only relevance to the probe involves the question of whether there is a factual basis for Cohen to claim that an attorney-client (A-C) relationship with Hannity should prevent investigators from perusing some materials seized by the FBI from Cohen's office and residences. And since Hannity is not suspected of wrongdoing, even that question appears to be of little importance.

"Consequently, there was no reason for Hannity's name to be revealed publicly."

Read entire article here.

 
 
— Andrew C. McCarthy, Legal Commentator, Terrorism Expert and Former Federal Prosecutor
— Andrew C. McCarthy, Legal Commentator, Terrorism Expert and Former Federal Prosecutor
Posted April 19, 2018 • 08:20 am
 
 
On SCOTUS Ruling on Criminal Deportation:
 
 

"WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court said Tuesday that part of a federal law that makes it easier to deport immigrants who have been convicted of crimes is too vague to be enforced.

"The court's 5-4 decision -- an unusual alignment in which new Justice Neil Gorsuch joined the four liberal justices -- concerns a catchall provision of immigration law that defines what makes a crime violent. Conviction for a crime of violence makes deportation 'a virtual certainty' for an immigrant, no matter how long he has lived in the United States, Justice Elena Kagan wrote in her opinion for the court.

"The decision is a loss for President Donald Trump's administration, which has emphasized stricter enforcement of immigration law. In this case, President Barack Obama's administration took the same position in the Supreme Court in defense of the challenged provision.

"With the four other conservative justices in dissent, it was the vote of the Trump appointee that was decisive in striking down the provision at issue. Gorsuch did not join all of Kagan's opinion, but he agreed with her that the law could not be left in place. Gorsuch wrote that 'no one should be surprised that the Constitution looks unkindly on any law so vague that reasonable people cannot understand its terms and judges do not know where to begin in applying it.'"

 
 
— The Associated Press
— The Associated Press
Posted April 18, 2018 • 07:28 am
 
 
On the Washington Collusion Creed:
 
 

"Colluders on the Loose ... If collusion is the twin of conspiracy, then there are lots of colluders running around Washington. ...

"James Comey himself was quite a colluder. Somehow, he managed to mislead Congress by assuring them that he had not written his assessment of Hillary Clinton before he interviewed her and supposedly had not been the source of or approved leaks to the media. He has contradicted what both Loretta Lynch and Andrew McCabe have said. He has deliberately misled a FISA court by withholding information from it, vital to any evaluation of the veracity of his writ. He probably lied when he was messaging the media that Trump was under investigation while simultaneously assuring Trump in person that he was not. He has admitted that he warped an FBI investigation into Hillary Clinton's private email server because he assumed she'd win the presidency -- an admission of politicized interference into a criminal investigation, if not a blatant confession that the FBI in felonious fashion was manipulating investigatory evidence to affect the outcome of a U.S. election. For Comey to escape legal exposure from all that required some sort of colluding help in high places. ...

"In sum, Washington lives by and for collusion. Always has. Until now, it was apparently just a creed, not a crime."

Read entire article here.

 
 
— Victor Davis Hanson, Hoover Institution Senior Fellow and Nationally Syndicated Columnist
— Victor Davis Hanson, Hoover Institution Senior Fellow and Nationally Syndicated Columnist
Posted April 17, 2018 • 08:50 am
 
 
On Lack of Accountability at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau:
 
 

"After watching Mick Mulvaney spar with Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., in recent days, it's tempting to make the modest proposal that President Trump nominate Mulvaney for every administration position that has to testify before Sens. Warren, Cory Booker, D-N.J., Kamala Harris, D-Calif., Chris Murphy, D-Conn., or any of the other senators running for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination.

"Mulvaney has earned Warren's ire because he is the acting director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, which was her brainchild. While she hasn't backed down in their colorful exchanges, Mulvaney has been winning on points. ...

"But here's the serious point about Mulvaney's sparring with Warren. The Senate also deserves answers and accountability from federal agencies such as the CFPB. That's because Congress, under our Constitution, is supposed to oversee the federal government.

"That authority, however, was denied to Congress deliberately when Warren and her ilk established the CFPB. After Warren expressed frustration that the bureau wasn't answering her questions well enough, Mulvaney wrote back: 'I encourage you to consider the possibility that the frustration you are experiencing now, and that which I had a few years back, are both inevitable consequences of the fact that the Dodd-Frank ... Act insulates the Bureau from virtually any accountability to the American people through their elected representatives.'"

Read entire article here.

 
 
— The Editors, Washington Examiner
— The Editors, Washington Examiner
Posted April 16, 2018 • 08:35 am
 
 
On Auditing the USPS:
 
 

"President Donald Trump ordered the U.S. Postal Service to undergo an audit Thursday evening, a move that comes after president's repeated claims that Amazon is fleecing the USPS through alleged unfair business practices. ...

"According to the executive order, a task force comprise of top officials, including Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, who would chair the group, will lead the investigation into the USPS' finances and will be required to issue recommendations and a final report no later than early August."

 
 
— Brent D. Griffiths, POLITICO
— Brent D. Griffiths, POLITICO
Posted April 13, 2018 • 08:08 am
 
 
On Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s 'Russia Investigation':
 
 

"Mr. Mueller is reaching the crossroads of his investigation and faces at least four critical decisions.

"One, Mr. Mueller can wind up his investigations now. He can write a report affirming that he has found no evidence while conducting his originally assigned inquiry: Donald Trump did not collude with the Russians to throw the election his way.

"Two, Mr. Mueller might pause and await Inspector General Michael Horowitz's report concerning possible Department of Justice and FBI abuses pertaining to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) Court. If Mr. Horowitz finds credible evidence of lawbreaking, then Mr. Mueller might seek indictments based on the IG's likely actionable evidence.

"Three, Mr. Mueller could continue to investigate anyone close to the Trump campaign for another year. If he did that, he would confirm that his inquiry has descended into a political cause. If Mr. Mueller calibrates the release of his findings to the fall midterm elections, he will be hailed by Trump opponents as a crusading prosecutor -- despite finding nothing related to collusion. A Democratic takeover of Congress would shut down congressional investigations of FBI and DOJ wrongdoing and further empower Mr. Mueller.

"Four, Mr. Mueller could more evenly apply his investigations of lying, obstruction of justice and collusion during the 2016 campaign. That way, he would reassure the country of equal treatment of all under the law."

 
 
— Victor Davis Hanson, Hoover Institution Senior Fellow and Nationally Syndicated Columnist
— Victor Davis Hanson, Hoover Institution Senior Fellow and Nationally Syndicated Columnist
Posted April 12, 2018 • 07:19 am
 
 
On Facebook Chairman and CEO Mark Zuckerberg's Congressional Testimony:
 
 

"It is hard to say what is more comical in this grilling of Facebook hoodie-in-chief Mark Zuckerberg by members of Congress.

"First, you have The Big Dork hissing and blistering like a screaming weenie over a Boy Scout campfire.

"'Facebook is an idealistic and optimistic company,' he sniveled in his opening remarks.

"We are talking about a behemoth company that peddles personal information scraped from millions of 'users' around the planet and has the power to promote people into the presidency -- or make them vanish.

"Yeah, 'idealistic' and 'optimistic' are the exact words that come to mind -- in Newspeak maybe. ...

"Shut up. You are not. Stop lying."

Read entire article here.

 
 
— Charles Hurt, The Washington Times
— Charles Hurt, The Washington Times
Posted April 11, 2018 • 07:46 am
 
 
On the London Mayor's Knife Crackdown:
 
 

"London has a problem. England's capital and largest city has seen a 40 percent increase in homicides in the last three years. There have been 53 murders already in 2018, and it is only April.

"Because it is near impossible to own a firearm legally in Britain, knives have been the go-to weapon in most of these murders. Authorities have noticed this, which is why the London Mayor Sadiq Khan announced this weekend that they would soon crackdown on anyone caught carrying a knife.

"'No excuses: there is never a reason to carry a knife. Anyone who does will be caught, and they will feel the full force of the law,' he tweeted. ...

"Go through the steps: They came for the firearms, so criminals moved on to other modes of violence, including knives. Authorities announced this weekend that they would treat knives as contraband. What do you suppose the criminal element will do now? They will move on to something equally fatal, and so on and so on until -- what, exactly? Scrutinizing blunt objects?"

 
 
— Becket Adams, Washington Examiner
— Becket Adams, Washington Examiner
Posted April 10, 2018 • 07:30 am
 
 
On the Rise of Technology Oligarchs:
 
 

"Once, the internet seemed to invite expanded access for an ever widening scope for content creators. Now, digitization appears to be hyper-concentrating media both geographically, on the coasts, and through pipelines controlled overwhelmingly by a firms like Facebook and Google. As the Guardian recently put it: 'If ExxonMobil attempted to insert itself into every element of our lives like this, there might be a concerted grassroots movement to curb its influence.'

"Ironically, the brouhaha over Russian efforts to influence the election may provide the oligarchs with the license to 'curate,' or more accurately censor, views they don't like. For the most part this censorship is being carried out under guidance developed largely by progressive groups like the Southern Poverty Law Center, which often labels anyone outside its ideological 'safe space' as racist bigots. What is considered hateful speech by the politically correct does not have to reflect neo-Nazi or Putin-inspired opinion; meanwhile there have been very few restraints on equally noxious voices on the left.

"Ultimately the tech moguls are following the approach described by the late radical social thinker C. Wright Mills: 'power elites' remain so by constraining debate in ways that do not threaten their core interests. The oligarchs' unprecedented wealth, married to new technologies, could help shape the nation's thinking in ways that represent a direct assault on pluralism and independent journalism. This needs to be recognized and opposed across the ideological spectrum by people committed to both pluralism and independent thought."

 
 
— Joel Kotkin, Chapman University R.C. Hobbs Presidential Fellow in Urban Futures and Center for Opportunity Urbanism Executive Director
— Joel Kotkin, Chapman University R.C. Hobbs Presidential Fellow in Urban Futures and Center for Opportunity Urbanism Executive Director
Posted April 09, 2018 • 08:05 am
 
Question of the Week   
Under which one of the following pen names were “The Federalist Papers” published (1787-1788)?
More Questions
Quote of the Day   
 
"Americans are well aware and focused on the need to protect our Southern border. But little thought has been given to the need to protect the border with Canada. ...An enormous, robust, and illegal opioid drug supply is streaming across our border with Canada, killing and poisoning tens of thousands of our citizens each year. Just last month, Canadian authorities busted a huge smuggling ring headquartered…[more]
 
 
—Maria Espinoza, Remembrance Project National Director
— Maria Espinoza, Remembrance Project National Director
 
Liberty Poll   

Will House Speaker Paul Ryan's decision not to seek re-election have a postive, negative or no effect on Republican chances to hold a majority in the mid-term elections?