In an interview with CFIF, Sally Pipes, President and the Taube Fellow in Health Care Studies at…
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ObamaScare: The ObamaCare Nightmare Continues

In an interview with CFIF, Sally Pipes, President and the Taube Fellow in Health Care Studies at the Pacific Research Institute, discusses how the nightmare continues with the second open enrollment season for ObamaCare commencing November 15th, days after the mid-term elections, and why ObamaCare may be on shaky ground as court battles loom.

Listen to the interview here.…[more]

October 31, 2014 • 09:48 am

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Notable Quotes
 
On Obama's Most Frustrating World Leader:
 
 

"It must be very frustrating to believe that a nation acts in its own best interests rather than the interests of an American political party. Despite [Israeli Prime Minister] Netanyahu's assurances that he wouldn't mess with the president's 2012 campaign, it is he, out of all the leaders in all the world, who frustrates Obama most. Not Russian autocrats who invade sovereign nations. Not genocidal Arab dictators. Netanyahu. I forget which sycophantic liberal pundit pointed out on Twitter that this makes sense because we're prone to be frustrated more by our friends than by our enemies. For that to be true, one would have to accept the dubious notion that the president ever considered Israel a 'friend' in any special sense."

 
 
— David Harsanyi, Syndicated Columnist
— David Harsanyi, Syndicated Columnist
Posted October 31, 2014 • 11:47 am
 
 
On Obama's US-Israel Foreign Policy Reset:
 
 

"So, a 'senior Obama administration official' called the prime minister of Israel -- our closest ally in the Middle East and one of the few nations in the region that is not (a) imploding or (b) actively funding or supporting terrorists -- 'a chickenshit.' While that word has rocketed around the globe, other descriptions of Benjamin Netanyahu include, 'recalcitrant, myopic, reactionary, obtuse, blustering, pompous, and '€˜Aspergery.'€™ And let'€™s not forget the worst word of all, 'coward.'

"Behold, the beautiful and delicate rhetorical stylings of our cultural and political elite. They'€™re the improvisational jazz musicians of American diplomacy, always ready with just the right word to solidify alliances, avoid unnecessary confrontation, and reassure Americans they know exactly what they're doing in the face of bloody violence. ...

"Bravo. You truly have 'reset' American foreign policy. You must feel so proud.'

 
 
— David French, American Center for Law and Justice Senior Counsel
— David French, American Center for Law and Justice Senior Counsel
Posted October 30, 2014 • 11:49 am
 
 
On 2015 Health Insurance Cost Hikes:
 
 

"Folks trying to plan their personal fiscal '15 are at a loss. They can't do a budget because they don't know what their health insurance costs will be.

"Nobody knows because Team Obama has conveniently arranged for you to be kept in the dark on your health insurance costs until after everyone votes next week.

"Most are expecting 5 percent to 10 percent hikes, but there are rumblings of far nastier surprises."

 
 
— Hugh Hewitt, Nationally Syndicated Radio Talk Show Host
— Hugh Hewitt, Nationally Syndicated Radio Talk Show Host
Posted October 29, 2014 • 12:19 pm
 
 
On ObamaCare and the Midterm Elections:
 
 

"Some Democrats and their advocates in the press believe Obamacare, a year into implementation, is no longer much of a factor in the midterm elections. But no one has told Republican candidates, who are still pounding away at the Affordable Care Act on the stump. And no one has told voters, especially those in states with closely contested Senate races, who regularly place it among the top issues of the campaign. ...

"So Republican candidates bash Obamacare and move up in the polls. Given that public opinion remains firmly against the health care law -- as it has been for years -- that's not a shock. Democratic beliefs to the contrary are probably wishful thinking.

"Polls suggest that more and more, opposition to Obamacare is based on voters' personal experience, and not just on what they have heard or read about the law. ...

"That does almost nothing to address voters' concerns, which remain a potent factor in the campaign. The bottom line is, there's a reason Republicans keep pushing so hard against Obamacare: So far, it's working."

 
 
— Byron York, The Washington Examiner Chief Political Correspondent
— Byron York, The Washington Examiner Chief Political Correspondent
Posted October 28, 2014 • 12:01 pm
 
 
On the Democrats' Campaign Finance Reform Irony:
 
 

"If Republicans win control of both the House and Senate, 'the interests of billionaires will come before the needs of the middle class,' President Barack Obama said at a $32,500-a-plate fundraiser at the $16 million Greenwich, Connecticut, estate of a billionaire named (I'm not making this up) Rich Richman.

"You can't top that remark for hypocrisy or the setting for irony. It isn't the middle class who write $32,500 checks. Those who do expect something in return. They've been getting it. ...

"The top group of fundraisers for Mr. Obama raised $457,834 for his 2008 campaign -- and were approved for federal grants and loans of $11.4 billion, according to the Government Accountability Institute. Selling access to the federal treasury has been a great way for Democrats to raise campaign funds. Since 1989, according to an analysis by Gateway Pundit, big donors have provided $416 million more in direct contributions to Democrats than Republicans."

 
 
— Jack Kelly, Syndicated Pittsburgh Post-Gazette Columnist
— Jack Kelly, Syndicated Pittsburgh Post-Gazette Columnist
Posted October 27, 2014 • 11:57 am
 
 
On the CDC's Ebola Gamble:
 
 

"In an effort to keep the public calm, the CDC pretended to know more about Ebola than it actually does.

First, the CDC insisted that Ebola is very difficult to transmit from person to person. But, that is clearly not true. This particular Ebola strain appears to be more infectious than others. ...

Second, the CDC insisted that Ebola is not airborne. That is probably mostly true, but it may not be entirely true. While airborne transmission is unlikely to explain more than just a few cases, it is still theoretically possible. ...

Finally, the CDC has relied on a 21-day quarantine period for people who may have been exposed to Ebola. But, a new study by Charles Haas from Drexel University suggests that this may not be sufficient. His research shows that a person has about a 12% chance of being infected with Ebola after the 21-day quarantine period expires."

 
 
— Alex Berezow, RealClearScience Founding Editor and USA TODAY's Board of Contributors Member
— Alex Berezow, RealClearScience Founding Editor and USA TODAY's Board of Contributors Member
Posted October 24, 2014 • 11:58 am
 
 
On 2014's Most Important Election:
 
 

"Louisville, KY - Barack Obama lost Kentucky in 2012 by 23 points, yet the state remains closely divided about re-electing the man whose parliamentary skills uniquely qualify him to restrain Obama's executive overreach. So, Kentucky's Senate contest is a constitutional moment that will determine whether the separation of powers will be reasserted by a Congress revitalized by restoration of the Senate's dignity.

"Mitch McConnell, 72, is second only to Henry Clay as the state'€™s most consequential public servant. McConnell's skills have been honed through five terms. He is, however -- let us say the worst -- not cuddly. National Review has said he has 'an owlish, tight-lipped public demeanor reminiscent of George Will.' Harsh. But true. ...

"[A] re-elected McConnell, with a Republican majority, would, he says, emulate his model of majority leadership -- the 16 years under a Democrat, Montana'€™s Mike Mansfield. He, like McConnell, had a low emotional metabolism but a subtle sense of the Senate's singular role in the nation's constitutional equilibrium."

 
 
— George F. Will, Nationally Syndicated Columnist
— George F. Will, Nationally Syndicated Columnist
Posted October 23, 2014 • 12:02 pm
 
 
On the Public-Health Establishment's Opposition to an Ebola Travel and Visa Moratorium:
 
 

"The public-health profession has a clear political orientation, so it's quite possible that its opposition to a visa and travel moratorium is influenced as much by belief in America's responsibility for the postcolonial oppression of Africa, and suspicion of American border enforcement, as it is by a commitment to public-health principles of containment and control. (African countries, unburdened by any such racial guilt, have not hesitated to impose travel bans; Nigeria's travel restrictions are now being credited for its escape from an Ebola incursion.) To be sure, the logistics of such a moratorium would be challenging, but no more challenging than retrofitting American hospitals for Ebola patients."

 
 
— Heather Mac Donald, Manhattan Institute Fellow and City Journal Contributing Editor
— Heather Mac Donald, Manhattan Institute Fellow and City Journal Contributing Editor
Posted October 22, 2014 • 11:58 am
 
 
On Questioning the Administration's Ebola Response:
 
 

"[I]t's up to Republicans to expose the bureaucracies and criticize the orthodoxies -- to ask why visas for travel to the United States are still being issued in West Africa and why American military forces are being deployed there without a workable plan or intelligible purpose, why CDC spending priorities are so skewed and CDC management so weak, and why here at home routine police powers aren't being used and routine public health measures aren't being implemented.

"Republicans can also point to an alternate path. They can draw upon genuine experts to explain what should be done. ...

"'Don'€™t politicize the tragedy of Ebola,' the liberal media will say. To the contrary, we say: Don'€™t be afraid to politicize the Ebola crisis -- but in the right way. What we need is politicization rightly understood, in which the opposition party exposes the failures of the administration in power and lays out a path to a better response. In so doing, conservatives -- who don'€™t worship at the altar of liberal bureaucracy and aren'€™t intimidated by the dogmas of progressive orthodoxy -- can make a case for their ability to effectively and faithfully discharge the duties of public office in the 21st century."

 
 
— William Kristol, The Weekly Standard Editor
— William Kristol, The Weekly Standard Editor
Posted October 21, 2014 • 11:48 am
 
 
On the White House's Ebola Messaging Problem:
 
 

"Much public skepticism about the government's response to Ebola stems from the dogmatic pronouncements of Obama administration officials. In a video message early last month on stopping the virus, for example, President Obama asserted that 'we know how to do it.' He was wrong. ...

"To fix his messaging problem, President Obama has appointed political fixer Ron Klain as its new Ebola response 'czar.' Mr. Klain's most significant contribution to public-health spin control came when he was Vice President Joe Biden's chief of staff during one of the worst public-health communications missteps of recent memory. During the 2009 H1N1 pandemic, Mr. Biden said on NBC'€™s 'Today' show that 'I wouldn'€™t go anywhere in confined places now.' The White House press office scrambled to walk back Mr. Biden's words, which threatened to disrupt public transportation and air travel."

 
 
— Dr. Scott Gottlieb, Former FDA Deputy Commissioner and Tevi Troy, Former HHS Deputy Secretary
— Dr. Scott Gottlieb, Former FDA Deputy Commissioner and Tevi Troy, Former HHS Deputy Secretary
Posted October 20, 2014 • 11:48 am
 
Question of the Week   
A measure to legalize the sale, manufacture and transportation of alcohol across the state will be addressed on the November 2014 ballot by voters in which one of the following?
More Questions
Quote of the Day   
 
"It must be very frustrating to believe that a nation acts in its own best interests rather than the interests of an American political party. Despite [Israeli Prime Minister] Netanyahu's assurances that he wouldn't mess with the president's 2012 campaign, it is he, out of all the leaders in all the world, who frustrates Obama most. Not Russian autocrats who invade sovereign nations. Not genocidal…[more]
 
 
—David Harsanyi, Syndicated Columnist
— David Harsanyi, Syndicated Columnist
 
Liberty Poll   

Predict Republican net gain of U.S. Senate seats in the midterm elections.