Yes, yes, July 4 is when we officially celebrate American independence, commemorating the day 56 men…
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Happy July 2: "The most memorable Epocha in the History of America"

Yes, yes, July 4 is when we officially celebrate American independence, commemorating the day 56 men pledged their lives, fortunes, and sacred honor for the cause of liberty. But John Adams for a moment believed the more momentous occasion was July 2, when the delegates of the Continental Congress cast the fateful vote to draft the Declaration of Independence that would sunder America’s ties with Great Britain. Adams, along with Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson, formed the drafting committee.

Those were heady days, the culmination of years of argument, abuse, and violence, with plenty more to come. Adams, standing at the center of history, took time to take stock and convey his thoughts to his beloved wife Abigail in two letters he wrote the morning and evening of July…[more]

July 02, 2015 • 05:40 pm

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Notable Quotes
 
On Independence Day:
 
 

"When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the Powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature's God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation.

"We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness. That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed ...

"We, therefore, the Representatives of the united States of America, in General Congress, Assembled, appealing to the Supreme Judge of the world for the rectitude of our intentions, do, in the Name, and by Authority of the good People of these Colonies, solemnly publish and declare, That these United Colonies are, and of Right ought to be Free and Independent States; that they are Absolved from all Allegiance to the British Crown, and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain, is and ought to be totally dissolved; and that as Free and Independent States, they have full Power to levy War, conclude Peace, contract Alliances, establish Commerce, and to do all other Acts and Things which Independent States may of right do. And for the support of this Declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes and our sacred Honor."

 
 
— The Declaration of Independence, In Congress, July 4, 1776
— The Declaration of Independence, In Congress, July 4, 1776
Posted July 02, 2015 • 14:22 pm
 
 
On the Prospect of Vice President Joe Biden Running for President in 2016:
 
 

"In a lot of ways, Biden would be the true anti-Hillary. He is completely uninhibited, he is impossible to script -- which makes him seem authentic -- and he has a human appeal that everyone can relate to. Clinton, on the other hand, is running a surreal campaign that avoids crowds, media and spontaneity of any kind. She is protecting her lead in the most standard, unimaginative way possible. Compared with Clinton's robotic, stiff approach, could having a reputation for occasionally saying the wrong thing and hugging too much work to Biden's advantage in an era where voters want the real thing? ...

"Maybe this is Biden's moment."

 
 
— Ed Rogers, Washington Post Contributor
— Ed Rogers, Washington Post Contributor
Posted July 01, 2015 • 12:12 pm
 
 
On ObamaCare and Private Health Insurance:
 
 

"Despite the Supreme Court decision to uphold the subsidies for private insurance in King v. Burwell, the fundamental problems with the Affordable Care Act remain. Ironically, it is the growing government centralization of health insurance at the expense of private insurance that must be addressed. ...

"Why is private health insurance so important? Insurance without access to medical care is a sham. And that is where the country is heading. According to a 2014 Merritt Hawkins survey, 55% of doctors in major metropolitan areas refuse new Medicaid patients. The harsh reality awaiting low-income Americans is dwindling access to quality doctors, hospitals and health care.

"Simultaneously, while the population ages into Medicare eligibility, a significant and growing proportion of doctors don’t accept Medicare patients. According to the nonpartisan Medicare Payment Advisory Commission, 29% of Medicare beneficiaries who were looking for a primary-care doctor in 2008 already had a problem finding one."

 
 
— Scott W. Atlas, M.D., Physician and Hoover Institution Senior Fellow
— Scott W. Atlas, M.D., Physician and Hoover Institution Senior Fellow
Posted June 30, 2015 • 12:12 pm
 
 
On the Supreme Court's ObamaCare Decision:
 
 

"As a conservative, I think it serves the country best if elected officials, not judges, repair what's wrong in Obamacare. Former Texas Gov. Rick Perry, a 2016 GOP presidential hopeful, hit the right note when he said he did not agree with the ruling. 'It was never up to the Supreme Court to save us from Obamacare,' he said in a statement issued Thursday.

"Because the Democratic Congress wrote a heavy-handed provision that the Obama White House determined it was best to ignore, the Supreme Court got handed a live grenade. With all the Democratic justices on board, Roberts jumped on the grenade -- leading with a bogus argument.

"The real casualty is any notion that the U.S. Supreme Court remains an honest broker."

 
 
— Debra J. Saunders, San Francisco Chronicle Syndicated Columnist
— Debra J. Saunders, San Francisco Chronicle Syndicated Columnist
Posted June 29, 2015 • 12:01 pm
 
 
On Hillary Clinton's Emails and the House Select Committee on Benghazi:
 
 

"Last March, Hillary Clinton told reporters she had turned over to the State Department every email from her secret system that bore any relation to her work as Secretary of State. 'I ... provided all my emails that could possibly be work-related,' Clinton told reporters.

"Now the State Department has admitted that is not true. ...

"One more thing. Included in the packet given to the committee Thursday evening were emails that Clinton had in fact turned over to the State Department but which the State Department had not turned over to the committee. So it appears that not only Clinton, but the State Department too, have not been as transparent as they have claimed in the email affair."

 
 
— Byron York, The Washington Examiner Chief Political Correspondent
— Byron York, The Washington Examiner Chief Political Correspondent
Posted June 26, 2015 • 11:50 am
 
 
On the President's Remarks in South Carolina:
 
 

"Mr. Obama has lost -- at least temporarily and perhaps permanently -- the ability to describe what we should aspire to as a nation. Rather than appealing to the better angels of our nature, the president employs ad hominem attacks against those who disagree with him, complains about the failure of his political agenda, and suggests that America has an almost genetic inclination toward racism.

"South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley does not have Mr. Obama's reputation for eloquence, but he would be wise to look to her example before he speaks Friday in Charleston at the funeral of Rev. Clementa Pinckney. There was a graciousness and a commitment to unify in Ms. Haley's words and actions this week. Many Americans once associated those traits with Barack Obama, and would like to do so again."

 
 
— Karl Rove, Former Deputy Chief of Staff to President George W. Bush
— Karl Rove, Former Deputy Chief of Staff to President George W. Bush
Posted June 25, 2015 • 12:15 pm
 
 
On Grace and Demographics in the South:
 
 

"Demographer Joel Kotkin found that 13 of the 15 best cities in the country for African Americans to live in are now in the South. Over the last decade, millions of African Americans have been reversing the Great Migration of a century ago to live in Dixie. A big part of that story is economic, of course -- the 'blue state' model has failed generations of minorities -- but it's also cultural. Word has gotten out that while the flags may be around in some places, the Old Confederacy is gone.

"Whenever conservatives complain that blacks vote monolithically Democratic, liberals are quick to argue that this is a rational decision given the realities of the black community. Surely, the same thing holds when they vote with their feet?

"No, the South isn't perfect; name a region that is. But it does have good manners, which is why it routinely acts with more dignity -- and in Charleston, with more grace -- than its critics to the north."

 
 
— Jonah Goldberg, National Review Senior Editor
— Jonah Goldberg, National Review Senior Editor
Posted June 24, 2015 • 12:17 pm
 
 
On SCOTUS Decision that Raisin Rules Violate Property Rights:
 
 

"The Raisin Administrative Committee is the federal government's version of OPEC, but for raisins. Created by a 1937 law, it had (until Monday) the power to seize and destroy raisins without necessarily compensating farmers. The aim was to keep raisin prices high through artificial scarcity. Under the program, the government could do what it wanted with the raisins. Farmers had only a moderate chance of recouping the money from the raisins they lost, depending on whether the bureaucrats found a way to sell them profitably.

"The Supreme Court, in a resounding eight-to-one decision, ruled against the raisin panel and the Obama administration's defense of it. They did not do so because it is an abomination to a free society to have government dictate market outcomes in this way, but rather because the physical seizure of the raisins and the forced transferal of title to the government constitutes an obvious taking of private property. ...

"This ruling could make it significantly harder for government to run raisin cartels and similar agricultural programs in the future. We hope it makes it impossible."

 
 
— The Editors, Washington Examiner
— The Editors, Washington Examiner
Posted June 23, 2015 • 12:08 pm
 
 
On the Leftward Turn in American Culture:
 
 

"Hillary Clinton knows she has more baggage than Newark Airport. She doesn't care, because she is counting on two strong forces to carry her to victory: Demographics and the leftward turn in American culture.

"She and the other Democrats suffer from cultural hubris, though. Their social justice wings always threaten to take them a little too close to the sun....

"The media often remind us that Democrats and Republicans used to forge bipartisan policy solutions, scolding Republicans for supposedly moving right.

"But if the center is becoming a lonely place in American politics, Democrats are walking away from it much more rapidly than Republicans are."

 
 
— Kyle Smith, New York Post
— Kyle Smith, New York Post
Posted June 22, 2015 • 12:40 pm
 
 
On Hillary Clinton's Glide to the Democratic Nomination:
 
 

"Mrs. Clinton is almost certainly about to glide to her party's nomination. There will be a few bumps. She will occasionally be pressed and challenged on various questions. There will be back and forth. But her Democratic opponents will not attack her character, her history, her financial decisions, her scandals. They will not go at her personally. She will emerge dinged but not damaged. No one will ravage the queen. ...

"The Democrats have an enforcement mechanism to keep all their candidates in line. Bernie Sanders and Martin O'Malley know without being told that the party will kill them if they tear apart the assumed nominee. Their careers will be over if they go at her personally."

 
 
— Peggy Noonan, The Wall Street Journal
— Peggy Noonan, The Wall Street Journal
Posted June 19, 2015 • 12:31 pm
 
Question of the Week   
How many U.S. national holidays have been established by Congress?
More Questions
Quote of the Day   
 
"When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the Powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature's God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation…[more]
 
 
—The Declaration of Independence, In Congress, July 4, 1776
— The Declaration of Independence, In Congress, July 4, 1776
 
Liberty Poll   

Should Vice President Joe Biden enter the 2016 race for the Democratic presidential nomination?