Among the myriad missteps and abuses of the Obama Administration, its habit of rogue lawmaking through…
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Congress Making Good On Rescinding Rogue "Privacy" Regulations Rammed Through by Obama's FCC

Among the myriad missteps and abuses of the Obama Administration, its habit of rogue lawmaking through unelected administrative agencies rather than the deliberative democratic process was perhaps the worst.  Even the most liberal Supreme Court justices on several occasions agreed, striking down Obama Administration regulatory impositions by unanimous votes.

And perhaps no federal agency represented that lawlessness and impropriety better than the Federal Communications Commission (FCC).

Last year as the clock began to expire on the Obama era, the FCC moved to impose new "privacy" regulations upon private Internet Service Providers (ISPs), upon which Americans rely to access the internet.  Those regulations actually did nothing on behalf of consumer privacy, or to prevent online data…[more]

March 22, 2017 • 09:56 pm

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Notable Quotes
 
On Democrats' About-Face on Intelligence Collection:
 
 

"Intelligence agencies cannot share details about American citizens with no foreign intelligence value. If [House Intelligence Committee Chairman David] Nunes is right, how were these procedures not broken? If a Bush-era intelligence agency had engaged in 'incidental collection' of Barack Obama's phone calls in 2008, and then disseminated that information, the Earth would have stopped in its orbit. (Sen. Rand Paul claims Obama's phone calls were intercepted 1,227 times and then masked. Being caught up in surveillance doesn't necessarily mean you're guilty of anything.) Now, because the person involved is named Donald Trump, journalists sprinted to the nearest media platform to push back against the story. ...

"Journalists, many of whom take every conspiracy about Russia and Trump seriously, have no reason to dismiss the potential abuses of the NSA. Even if intel agencies failed to minimize frivolous information, it is still an abuse. Nunes, as far as I know, has not made any bizarre allegations in the past. It's not implausible that information legally obtained about Trump was subsequently abused by a government agency. In fact, Democrats have been warning us for years that something like this would happen."

 
 
— David Harsanyi, The Federalist Senior Editor
— David Harsanyi, The Federalist Senior Editor
Posted March 23, 2017 • 08:27 am
 
 
On Electronic Surveillance and the Trump Campaign:
 
 

"So here we are with gallons of ink, forests of trees and gigabytes of pixels being spent on one single tweet where Mr. Trump regurgitated press accounts reporting that the Obama administration used electronic surveillance to investigate Mr. Trump's campaign.

"That claim is incontrovertibly accurate. The hardest and clearest evidence of this is that Mr. Trump's national security adviser and former campaign operative Mike Flynn was fired over lying about leaked transcripts of 'wiretapped' phone calls between him and the Russian ambassador.

"No one can dispute that intelligence officials inside the Obama administration used electronic surveillance to spy on the Trump campaign. All anybody can quibble about -- and quibble they have -- is the exact wording Mr. Trump used in his 140-characters-or-less message."


Read entire article here

 
 
— Charles Hurt, The Washington Times
— Charles Hurt, The Washington Times
Posted March 22, 2017 • 08:11 am
 
 
On Judge Neil Gorsuch's Statement to the Senate Judiciary Committee:
 
 

"Judge Gorsuch's opening statement to the Senate Judiciary Committee was a model of gratitude and grace. ...

"It was the end of his testimony, however, that was most powerful. Reflecting on a tombstone of a colonial-era lawyer and judge, a man named Increase Sumner, Judge Gorsuch quoted his epitaph:

'As a lawyer, he was faithful and able. As a judge, patient, impartial, and decisive. In private life he was affectionate and mild. In public life he was dignified and firm. Party feuds were allayed by the correctness of his conduct. Calumny was silenced by the weight of his virtues, and rancor softened by the amenity of his manners.'

"Gorsuch says those words guide him, serving for him as a 'daily reminder of the law's integrity, that a useful life can be led in its service, of the hard work it takes, and an encouragement to good habits when I fail and when I falter.' The evidence that he lives those values is found in the bipartisan acclaim for his courtesy and integrity. At today's hearing, Americans saw a humble public servant, and in these troubled times, a little humility is exactly what America needs to see."

 
 
— David French, National Review
— David French, National Review
Posted March 21, 2017 • 08:25 am
 
 
On Senate Democrats and the Nomination of Judge Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court:
 
 

"Already, Democrats in the Senate have declared that they have no interest in taking Judge Gorsuch or his confirmation hearings seriously.

"'The high burden of proof that Judge Gorsuch has to meet is largely a result of the president who nominated him,' said Sen. Richard Blumenthal, a Democrat who was elected to the Senate from the ridiculous state of Connecticut despite repeatedly lying about fighting in the Vietnam War.

"In other words, according to Mr. Blumenthal, it's all about politics. Nothing to do with the Constitution. He doesn't like the president, so he will never vote for Judge Gorsuch's confirmation.

"Break out the smelling salts. It's gonna be a long, putrid week along the Potomac River."

 
 
— Charles Hurt, The Washington Times
— Charles Hurt, The Washington Times
Posted March 20, 2017 • 08:24 am
 
 
On President Trump's Budget:
 
 

"For much of the Washington news media, cutting federal funding for something is the same as opposing that thing. Trump's budget, however, makes a distinction that these critics miss. Federal funding should be for things that are best done by the federal government. Many things are better done at a level of government closer to the individual, or even outside government altogether. ...

"Total funding levels matter. Efficiency and demonstration of results are important. But the most important thing in this budget is the White House's efforts to get the federal government back in the business of doing what it should be doing and can do better than anyone else, and leaving the other things, however crucial they are, to the people who can do them better."

 
 
— The Editors, Washington Examiner
— The Editors, Washington Examiner
Posted March 17, 2017 • 07:53 am
 
 
On Speaker Paul Ryan's ObamaCare Replacement Bill:
 
 

"House Speaker Paul Ryan says the nation has just two options. It can accept his repeal and replace bill or it can keep the mess it already has. 'It really comes down to a binary choice,' he said, trying to whip recalcitrant conservatives into line behind the American Health Care Act. 'This is the closest we will ever get to repealing and replacing Obamacare.' ...

"There's another option. Republicans could pass a better Obamacare replacement, one that doesn't preserve costly regulations or create a brand new entitlement. ...

"There's also no reason to believe the current bill has a better chance of passing than a genuinely conservative alternative. Centrist Republicans are abandoning Ryan's bill after the Congressional Budget Office predicted that it would leave millions more people without insurance. ...

"The 'binary choice' is a false premise and thus a bad argument. It's also bad politics that will yield bad policy. Republicans and conservatives who want real healthcare reform (not merely tax cuts) should withhold support at least until their leaders agree to consider other possible roads out of Obamacare."

 
 
— The Editors, Washington Examiner
— The Editors, Washington Examiner
Posted March 16, 2017 • 08:31 am
 
 
On MSNBC's Rachel Maddow's Trump Tax Return 'Story':
 
 

"MSNBC's unapologetic liberal 'journalist' Rachel Maddow lit the internet on fire Tuesday night when she teased via Twitter that she'd gotten her hands on President Donald Trump's tax returns -- a scoop that would have been pretty juicy, considering Trump never released his tax returns during the presidential campaign as all other modern-era presidents have done.

"If only it'd been true.

"What Maddow and the fine folks over at MSNBC actually managed to do was get part of a copy of Trump's 2005 tax return. Which was already 12 years old. And which the White House had already released.

"And which the Wall Street Journal had already reported on -- a year ago."

 
 
— Brittany M. Hughes, MRCTV Assistant Editor
— Brittany M. Hughes, MRCTV Assistant Editor
Posted March 15, 2017 • 07:52 am
 
 
On Fixing the Internal Revenue Service:
 
 

"Why is IRS Commissioner John Koskinen still in office? A growing number of Capitol Hill Republicans want to know -- and they have good reason to be troubled.

"When he took over in 2013, Koskinen was supposed to 'fix' the IRS -- and in particular get to the bottom of the scandal in which the agency deliberately held up approvals for 75 conservative and Tea Party groups that had applied for legitimate tax exemptions.

"Instead, what Congress and the public got from him was obstruction, open defiance and a refusal to discipline anyone at the agency. Indeed, he seemed most concerned with running interference to shield the Obama administration from any embarrassment. ...

"It's clear there'll be no IRS reforms while Koskinen is in office. He's the No. 1 candidate in Washington for President Trump's signature line: 'You're fired.'"

 
 
— New York Post Editorial Board
— New York Post Editorial Board
Posted March 14, 2017 • 08:08 am
 
 
On Cleaning House at DOJ:
 
 

"President Trump won the election with a promise to drain the Washington swamp. No swamp is more in need of draining than the Department of Justice, horribly corrupted by eight years of misrule. Attorney General Jeff Sessions has his work cut out for him. Bureaucrats and lawyers at DOJ will fight him every step of the way as he tries to reform the department.

"The press will fight him, too -- especially when it comes to efforts to restore professionalism to the Civil Rights Division. That division is now a cesspool of bias and incompetence, but reporters will imply that every effort Sessions makes to reform it is 'racist.'

"Sessions faces a daunting task, but he is the right man for the job. Conservatives need to be prepared to support him, aggressively, as he begins to clean the Augean stables of the Department of Justice."

 
 
— John Hinderaker, PowerLine Blog
— John Hinderaker, PowerLine Blog
Posted March 13, 2017 • 07:54 am
 
 
On Conspiracies and the Rabbit Hole of Espionage:
 
 

"When he was Ronald Reagan's secretary of state, George Shultz was once asked about the CIA's disavowal of involvement in a mysterious recent bombing in Lebanon. Replied Shultz: 'If the CIA denies something, it's denied.'

"Has there ever been a more dry, more wry, more ironic verdict on the world of espionage? Within it, there is admission and denial, smoke and mirrors, impenetrable fog and deliberate obfuscation. Truth? Ask the next guy.

"Which is why my default view of espionage is to never believe anyone because everyone is trained in deception. This is not a value judgment; it's a job description."

 
 
— Charles Krauthammer, Syndicated Columnist
— Charles Krauthammer, Syndicated Columnist
Posted March 10, 2017 • 08:00 am
 
Question of the Week   
Which one of the following do Presidents Jimmy Carter, Andrew Johnson, William Henry Harrison and Zachary Taylor all have in common?
More Questions
Quote of the Day   
 
"Intelligence agencies cannot share details about American citizens with no foreign intelligence value. If [House Intelligence Committee Chairman David] Nunes is right, how were these procedures not broken? If a Bush-era intelligence agency had engaged in 'incidental collection' of Barack Obama's phone calls in 2008, and then disseminated that information, the Earth would have stopped in its orbit…[more]
 
 
—David Harsanyi, The Federalist Senior Editor
— David Harsanyi, The Federalist Senior Editor
 
Liberty Poll   

President Trump’s new budget proposal increases defense spending by $54 billion, to be paid for with significant cuts to the State Dept. and lesser cuts to domestic agencies. Generally, do you approve or disapprove of that approach?