In our Liberty Update commentary entitled "No, Scandinavia Doesn't Vindicate Socialism" this week, we…
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Image of the Day: Gallup Poll on Americans' View of Job Market Hits All-Time Record

In our Liberty Update commentary entitled "No, Scandinavia Doesn't Vindicate Socialism" this week, we rightly ridicule admitted socialist Bernie Sanders, including his odd claim that "we now have an economy that is fundamentally broke and grotesquely unfair."  Well, as this Gallup survey illustrates, he's swimming upstream against American public opinion.  Specifically, in a survey that Gallup has conducted periodically since 2001, the public's view of the job market has now hit an all-time record high:

. [caption id="" align="alignleft" width="720"] Sorry, Socialists[/caption]

 

. Perhaps this helps explain why Sanders has suddenly plummeted in 2020 Democratic candidate surveys, although one wonders how long people like Elizabeth Warren can avoid the same fate.

 …[more]

June 14, 2019 • 02:30 pm

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Sean Bielat: The Man Who Wants To Beat Barney Frank Print
By Ashton Ellis
Thursday, October 07 2010
To win, Bielat must convince independent voters that Frank’s liberal approach to government spending isn’t the cure for what ails the economy. Thanks to mounting deficits and a failed stimulus, Bielat is finding that voters in the district are open to change.

Never before has Rep. Barney Frank (D-MA) faced such a serious challenge from a Republican of any stripe, let alone one who is pro-business and pro-military.  If the tax-and-spend liberal stalwart gets swept away in the GOP tsunami barreling towards Democrat-controlled Washington, D.C. this November, supporters of limited government everywhere will have Sean Bielat to thank. 

So, what makes Bielat (BEE-lat) think he can unseat a thirty year incumbent?  Two words: Scott Brown.  “(U.S. Senator) Brown (R-MA) won the fourth congressional district handily in January, and a lot of people started looking for another Republican who could win in Massachusetts.  Early on, my campaign demonstrated that I am that kind of candidate.”    

When asked if he considers himself a “Scott Brown Republican” Bielat demurs.  “I’m a ‘Sean Bielat Republican.’”  By that he means someone who wants government programs to be fiscally sustainable, a national defense strategy based on the national interest and serious entitlement reform, particularly Social Security.  “No one will be happy with the fixes that need to be made to Social Security, but we’ve got to get working now on a real solution before drastic measures are needed.” 

One of Bielat’s solutions is to phase in an increase in the retirement age to 70.  “Things can be done gradually so that no one gets squeezed.  For example, we could raise the retirement age by one month every year so that people can plan for the future.”  That alone would reduce pressure on the Social Security program while saving people the shock of a sudden change. 

Of course, Barney Frank doesn’t see it that way.  “He’s framing my position as an immediate switch from 65 to 70 in order to scare people.  It’s the kind of reaction that benefits the status quo at the expense of letting an unsustainable program go unreformed.” 

Turning to his differences with Frank, Bielat gets right to the point.   

“My single biggest difference with Barney Frank is governing philosophy.  He thinks government is better at decisions than individuals, that there is no limit to what government can and should do.  My experience teaches that [Frank’s] philosophy is wrong.” 

Along with his service as a Marine, Bielat’s business background includes time as a management consultant with McKinsey & Company, as well as the lead project manager for a firm that develops robots to detect and defuse roadside bombs in Iraq.  The experience of working in corporate America and now as an independent consultant make Bielat intimately aware of the harm done to productivity by oppressive taxes and regulations.  If elected to Congress, Bielat plans to focus primarily on undoing the damage done by Frank and others to America’s economic prosperity. 

“It makes no sense to raise taxes or impose new regulations in a recession,” says Bielat.  “We’ve got to have a real economic stimulus, and it starts by giving people their money back through reducing taxes, and scaling back the regulatory environment that is causing people to freeze hiring.  I’ve talked to numerous small business owners in the Fourth District who tell me they want to hire more people, but aren’t because they’re waiting to see what the IRS, ObamaCare and the EPA are going to do.” 

If elected to Congress, Bielat would work to make cuts in discretionary spending.  He includes within such spending money appropriated to the Defense Department, arguing that reductions in the civilian workforce and changes to the procurement process would result in substantial savings. 

To win, Bielat must convince independent voters that Frank’s liberal approach to government spending isn’t the cure for what ails the economy.  Thanks to mounting deficits and a failed stimulus, Bielat is finding that voters in the district are open to change. 

Apparently, Barney Frank is reading the same tea leaves.  Former President Bill Clinton’s hosting of a district fundraiser for Frank is interpreted by many political observers as an admission that Frank is worried.  With Bielat continuing to close the polling gap, the National Republican Campaign Committee now lists him as “On the Radar,” a designation that heightens his appeal to Republican donors. 

This year’s midterm elections are certain to end the careers of several notable members of Congress.  If big-spending Barney Frank is one of them, supporters of limited government can thank Sean Bielat. 

Question of the Week   
Prior to 2016, what was the last Presidential election year in which the candidate who won had never before held elected public office?
More Questions
Quote of the Day   
 
"And so it has come to this.Two oil tankers were just attacked in the Gulf of Oman, presumably by Iran. The United States and China are facing off in a confrontation that is about far more than trade. The southern border remains anarchic and uncontrolled.And Congress is asking: 'Can I get the icon in cornflower blue?'Here is the situation: The president of these United States gets from place to place…[more]
 
 
—Kevin D. Williamson, National Review
— Kevin D. Williamson, National Review
 
Liberty Poll   

Should the 2020 U.S. Census add a multi-part question regarding U.S. citizenship, including specifically whether the respondent is or is not a U.S. citizen?