Here's some potentially VERY good economic news that was lost amid the weekend news flurry.  Those…
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Some Potentially VERY Good Economic News

Here's some potentially VERY good economic news that was lost amid the weekend news flurry.  Those with "skin in the game," and who likely possess the best perspective, are betting heavily on an upturn, as highlighted by Friday's Wall Street Journal:

Corporate insiders are buying stock in their own companies at a pact not seen in years, a sign they are betting on a rebound after a coronavirus-induced rout.  More than 2,800 executives and directors have purchased nearly $1.19 billion in company stock since the beginning of March.  That's the third-highest level on both an individual and dollar basis since 1988, according to the Washington Service, which provides data analytics about trading activity by insiders."

Here's why that's important:

Because insiders typically know the…[more]

March 30, 2020 • 11:02 am

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Let-Them-Eat-Cake Nancy Print
By CFIF Staff
Thursday, November 05 2009
The economy is the fundamental political issue because the political class, bipartisanly, got us to this dreadful place. We could count the ways, but you know all those, even if the political class, bipartisanly, doesn’t.

Marie Antoinette had nothing on House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, except perhaps Marie’s ignominious end, no longer practiced in civilized countries.

Tuesday’s gubernatorial elections in Virginia and New Jersey, once all the noise is removed, produced one inescapable conclusion.  It did not take those elections to produce that conclusion.  It is as plain as day, but there is something about our time in America that requires a two-by-four up aside the head to get through.

The voters of New Jersey and Virginia said they are hurt, confused and angry.  They are hurt, confused and angry over the shambles that is our economy.  Yes, it is still (and seemingly ever) the economy, stupid, as some clichéd headlines acknowledge, although stupid is really much too weak a word to describe those who don’t get this.

Tell us that the same motivating factor is not the fundamental political issue across all fifty states, and either you’re really not knowledgeable enough to be talking or you’re a liberal political consultant trying to hang onto your retainer.  Not national?  Only in a political fantasy is the economic pain of the electorate not national.

The economy is the fundamental political issue because the political class, bipartisanly, got us to this dreadful place.  We could count the ways, but you know all those, even if the political class, bipartisanly, doesn’t.

So against that backdrop, with unemployment nudging 10 percent nationally and much worse in some areas and for some groups of workers, with local, state and national debt escalating like swine flu, what does the most powerful person in Congress do?

Does she tell the American people that Congress got the message, and until the economy is fixed (not based on the lying data of lying politicians and lying bureaucrats), Congress is going to devote every waking hour to fixing it, whatever that takes?  Does she walk among the barrios and the plains and the tent cities from sea to angry sea, offering, even insincerely, comfort to the afflicted?

She does not.  Instead, she makes some calculated, cutesy statement about gaining two Democrat votes (from California and New York special elections to fill, temporarily, empty seats) so she can plunge ahead in her imperial attempt to transform American health care into the most disruptive, costly and byzantine system of statist dictate yet perpetrated on the American people (and we are already enduring some past champions of the genre).

She schedules a vote for Saturday.  Does the House plan cost $1.2 trillion or $2.4 trillion?  None of the numbers are even close to the ultimate reality.  And for what?  Are you going to be better off?  Are your neighbors?  Are your children?  Your parents?  Your doctor?  Your hospital?

You’ve heard all the arguments, pro and con.   If you’re for it, or if you’re for your Congress doing this right now at the expense of critical economic issues, to which this will but add, then enjoy your weekend.  If not, well, you might better be doing some fast critical thinking as to how you can convince your Representative in the House to respond to you, not to Nancy Pelosi, and now.

Pelosi must have this vote before the House recesses.  She knows it; the President knows it.  That’s the only hope either of them have to keep their members in the Yellow Submarine after Tuesday’s election, which was not about who or which party won or lost, but about what people, in states far more than two, desperately want and need.

It’s not this.  Not this way.  Not now.

Question of the Week   
In which one of the following years did Congress first meet in Washington, D.C.?
More Questions
Quote of the Day   
 
"New York Governor Andrew Cuomo called on the federal government to take control of the medical supply market. Illinois Governor J.B. Pritzker demanded that President Trump take charge and said 'precious months' were wasted waiting for federal action. Some critics are even more direct in demanding a federal takeover, including a national quarantine.It is the legal version of panic shopping. Many seem…[more]
 
 
—Jonathan Turley, George Washington University Shapiro Professor of Public Interest Law
— Jonathan Turley, George Washington University Shapiro Professor of Public Interest Law
 
Liberty Poll   

Who is most to blame for the delay in passage of the critical coronavirus economic recovery (or stimulus) bill?