ALEXANDRIA, VA – Today, the Federal Communications Commission ("FCC") voted to advance a Notice of…
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CFIF Applauds FCC Vote to Advance NPRM to Restore Internet Freedom

ALEXANDRIA, VA – Today, the Federal Communications Commission ("FCC") voted to advance a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) on the "Restoring Internet Freedom" proposal championed by Chairman Ajit Pai and Commisser Mike O'Reilly that would return federal internet regulatory policy to the light-touch approach that prevailed from the 1990s onward, until the Obama Administration FCC moved to reclassify the internet as a "public utility" in 2015.

In response, Center for Individual Freedom ("CFIF") Senior Vice President of Legal and Public Affairs Timothy Lee issued the following statement:

"Beginning in the 1990s, the internet flourished and transformed our world like no innovation in history for a simple reason:  Administrations of both political parties over two decades, beginning…[more]

May 18, 2017 • 12:36 pm

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Jester's CourtroomLegal tales stranger than stranger than fiction: Ridiculous and sometimes funny lawsuits plaguing our courts.
Home Jester's Courtroom Bounced out of Court
Bounced out of Court Print
Wednesday, February 29 2012

A judge in a New York City court has thrown out a lawsuit filed by a New Jersey man who got so drunk playing Beer Pong that he walked across a busy highway and was struck by a car.

Manhattan Supreme Court Justice Lucy Billings threw out Alan Berger's lawsuit against Greenwich Village's Wicked Willy's, finding Berger signed up for the beer-drinking game of his own free will.  The object of the game is to bounce a ping pong ball into another player's cup and get them to drink.

“Despite the game tables, cups and alcohol [that the] defendant bar made available to plaintiff and other bar patrons without serving the alcohol or monitoring its consumption, plaintiff voluntarily engaged in the drinking game” and “consumed alcohol to the point of diminished capacity,” Billings wrote.

Berger's suit charged that the bar should have monitored the game to make sure players weren't getting visibly drunk.  According to news reports, Berger engaged in a heated 3 1/2-hour match with friends playing the game, eventually left the bar, took a bus back to New Jersey and was still so drunk he tried to cross a highway and got hit by a car going 50 miles an hour. 

Berger suffered numerous injuries, including a broken hip, leg and foot, tears in both his knees, and a lacerated liver, the lawyer said. When his blood was checked at the hospital about four hours after he left the bar, his blood alcohol content was .26 — almost four times higher than the legal driving limit.

The suit sought to hold the bar accountable for having “organized, created, designed and set up” the Beer Pong area in the back of the bar, and then failing to monitor it.  It asked for unspecified money damages for his “severe shock, pain and mental anguish.”

Justice Billings, however, found that Beer Pong players are playing at their own risk. She found the bar had “no duty” to “warn patrons regarding the risks of engaging in the drinking activity” or “monitoring its participants.”

—Source:  nypost.com

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"Leaking classified information has become the new norm, and the leakers are providing a feeding frenzy for the media. However, these leakers are criminals, and their actions have already alienated key allies and caused distress in the Trump White House and in the intelligence agencies. The leakers' goal is to undermine Mr. Trump and his agenda, even at the high price of committing a criminal act.…[more]
 
 
—Mercedes Schlapp, Former WH Director of Specialty Media for President George W. Bush and Co-founder of Cove Strategies
— Mercedes Schlapp, Former WH Director of Specialty Media for President George W. Bush and Co-founder of Cove Strategies
 
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How safe do you currently feel attending events in large venues (concerts, ball games, etc.) in the United States?