The U.S. travel technology firm Sabre may not ring an immediate bell, and perhaps you’ve not yet heard…
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On Sabre/Farelogix Merger, DOJ Mustn’t Undertake a Misguided Antitrust Boondoggle

The U.S. travel technology firm Sabre may not ring an immediate bell, and perhaps you’ve not yet heard of its proposed acquisition of Farelogix, but it looms as one of the most important antitrust cases to approach trial since AT&T/Time-Warner. The transaction’s most significant aspect is the way in which it offers a perfect illustration of overzealous bureaucratic antitrust enforcement, and the way that can delay and also punish American consumers. Specifically, the transaction enhances rather than inhibits market competition, and will benefit both travelers and the travel industry by accelerating innovation.  That’s in part because Sabre and Farelogix aren’t head-to-head market competitors, but rather complementary businesses.  While Sabre serves customers throughout the…[more]

January 13, 2020 • 03:53 pm

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He's Out (Literally) Print
Wednesday, July 16 2014

A New York baseball fan is suing ESPN after allegedly being mocked by two of its announcers for snoozing in Yankee Stadium during the April 13 night game between the Yankees and the Boston Red Sox.

Andrew Rector, who admits to catching a few zzzzs during the game, has filed a $10 million defamation suit against the team, the sports network, its play-by-play man Dan Shulman and big-leaguer-turned-commentator John Kruk.

In his lawsuit, Rector claims Kruk unleashed an “avalanche of disparaging words” over his nationally televised nap, including such "false statements" as Rector was "not worthy" to be a Yankee fan and “is a fatty cow that need (sic) two seats at all time (sic) and represent (sic) symbol of failure.” Rector further claims to have "suffered substantial injury" to his "character and reputation," as well as “mental anguish, loss of future income and loss of earning capacity.”

In a statement, ESPN refuted Rector’s claims. “The comments attributed to ESPN and our announcers were clearly not said in our telecast. The claims presented here are wholly without merit.”

Rector’s lawyer, Valentine Okwara, told news reporters, “We’ll settle this in court.”

Source: nypost.com

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Which one of the following was the first African-American soloist to appear at the Metropolitan Opera House in New York City?
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"Federal prosecutors are scrutinizing whether former FBI Director James Comey leaked classified information about a possible Russian disinformation campaign to journalists, according to a bombshell New York Times report.The inquiry, which kicked off in recent months, appears to focus on information from documents that Dutch intelligence obtained from Russian computers and provided to the U.S. government…[more]
 
 
—Chuck Ross, Daily Caller
— Chuck Ross, Daily Caller
 
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