What’s old is somehow new again on the political left. Desperate for what they perceive as street…
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House Democrats Revive Obama FCC's Ruinous Effort to Regulate Internet

What’s old is somehow new again on the political left.

Desperate for what they perceive as street cred, leftists continue to repackage failed policies as somehow novel, in a destructive race to claim the most extreme realms of the political continuum.

Merely three decades after it was consigned to the dustbin of failed ideas, socialism actually maintains renewed popularity on the left.  According to Gallup, a majority of Democrats no longer view capitalism favorably, but almost 60% view socialism positively.

People like Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D – New York) advocate a return to income tax rates not seen since President John F. Kennedy began cutting them.  Thirty-five years after Jeane Kirkpatrick delivered her famous 1984 Republican convention speech castigating…[more]

April 12, 2019 • 01:44 pm

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Jester's CourtroomLegal tales stranger than stranger than fiction: Ridiculous and sometimes funny lawsuits plaguing our courts.
Home Jester's Courtroom The Kindle Ate My Homework
The Kindle Ate My Homework Print
Thursday, August 20 2009

It used to be that the most popular excuse for missing homework was that “the dog ate it.” Not so if you are Justin Gawronski, a 17-year-old Michigan high school senior. Gawronski is blaming Amazon for losing his homework after the company wirelessly deleted a copy of George Orwell's “1984” from Gawronski's Kindle, deleting along with it the notes he had taken on the device for his homework.

According to the complaint filed in a federal class action lawsuit in Seattle: “As part of his studies of '1984,' Mr. Gawronski had made copious notes in the book. After Amazon remotely deleted '1984,' those notes were rendered useless because they no longer referenced the relevant parts of the book. The notes are still accessible on the Kindle 2 device in a file separate from the deleted book, but are of no value. For example, a note such as 'remember this paragraph for your thesis' is useless if it does not actually reference a specific paragraph. By deleting '1984' from Mr. Gawronski's Kindle 2, this is the position in which Amazon left him. Mr. Gawronski now needs to recreate all of his studies.”

Gawronski seeks to prevent Amazon from again deleting books from Kindles. Gawronski also seeks monetary relief for his lost work. He filed the lawsuit, he said, because he wants to “help set a precedent so that Amazon doesn't do this again” and to help move the industry forward. “When you think that you own something and don't own it – that's not how it should be,” he said.

According to news sources, the Amazon Kindle Terms of Service shows that Amazon has the right to do what they will with the books: “You acknowledge that the sale of the Device to you does not transfer to you title to or ownership of any intellectual property rights of Amazon or its suppliers. All of the Software is licensed, not sold, and such license is non-exclusive…Amazon reserves the right to modify, suspend, or discontinue the Service at any time, and Amazon will not be liable to you should it exercise such right.”

—Source: WSJ.com

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