The U.S. travel technology firm Sabre may not ring an immediate bell, and perhaps you’ve not yet heard…
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On Sabre/Farelogix Merger, DOJ Mustn’t Undertake a Misguided Antitrust Boondoggle

The U.S. travel technology firm Sabre may not ring an immediate bell, and perhaps you’ve not yet heard of its proposed acquisition of Farelogix, but it looms as one of the most important antitrust cases to approach trial since AT&T/Time-Warner. The transaction’s most significant aspect is the way in which it offers a perfect illustration of overzealous bureaucratic antitrust enforcement, and the way that can delay and also punish American consumers. Specifically, the transaction enhances rather than inhibits market competition, and will benefit both travelers and the travel industry by accelerating innovation.  That’s in part because Sabre and Farelogix aren’t head-to-head market competitors, but rather complementary businesses.  While Sabre serves customers throughout the…[more]

January 13, 2020 • 03:53 pm

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Home Jester's Courtroom What’s a College Degree Worth These Days?
What’s a College Degree Worth These Days? Print
Thursday, March 21 2019

Two Stanford University students have filed a class action lawsuit against the eight universities named in the college admissions scandal, claiming their degrees from Stanford have been tarnished and that the rigged system of paying for admission denied students a fair chance to be enrolled at an elite university.

Stanford University, ranked #7 in US News & World Report rankings, is named along with USC, UCLA, the University of San Diego, the University of Texas at Austin, Wake Forest University, Yale University and Georgetown University. The class action lawsuit seeks damages for any student who applied to one or more of those universities and was rejected between 2012 and last year.

The named plaintiffs in this case, Stanford students Erica Olsen and Kalea Woods, both allege they were among those who were denied by elite schools named in the investigation. Olsen said she applied to Yale, paid a $80 application fee, and was denied admission, despite a nearly perfect SAT and ACT score and her extracurriculars. Olsen is a student at Stanford.

“Had she known that the system at Yale University was warped and rigged by fraud, she would not have spent the money to apply to the school,” the lawsuit states. “She also did not receive what she paid for — a fair admissions consideration process.”

Source: LATimes.com

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"Federal prosecutors are scrutinizing whether former FBI Director James Comey leaked classified information about a possible Russian disinformation campaign to journalists, according to a bombshell New York Times report.The inquiry, which kicked off in recent months, appears to focus on information from documents that Dutch intelligence obtained from Russian computers and provided to the U.S. government…[more]
 
 
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