CFIF has joined a broad coalition of fellow conservative and libertarian free-market organizations in…
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Image of the Day: Peril of a "Buy American" Medical Mandate

CFIF has joined a broad coalition of fellow conservative and libertarian free-market organizations in opposing any proposed "Buy American" mandates on medicines, because they would place unnecessary sourcing requirements upon medicines and medical imputs purchased with federal dollars.  That is the last thing that Americans need at the moment, not least because it doesn't single out China in the way that some falsely assume, and the just-released coalition letter is worth reading in its entirety here.

In that vein, however, this image helpfully illustrates some of the logic behind the letter:

[caption id="" align="aligncenter" width="574"] The Peril of a "Buy American" Order[/caption]

 …[more]

April 07, 2020 • 11:04 am

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Jester's CourtroomLegal tales stranger than stranger than fiction: Ridiculous and sometimes funny lawsuits plaguing our courts.
Home Jester's Courtroom They Were Skating on Thin Ice
They Were Skating on Thin Ice Print
Wednesday, March 11 2020

A Massachusetts judge has ruled in favor of several student athletes on a girls' hockey team who were disciplined by their high school for attending a house party where alcohol was served.

Norfolk County Superior Court Judge Maynard Kirpalani granted preliminary injunctive relief to the five teammates on grounds that Braintree Public High School's policy was too vague to be enforced.

"Under these circumstances, persons of common intelligence would likely differ on whether the plaintiffs were in the presence of alcohol and, thus, in possession of alcohol within meaning of the policy," Judge Kirpalani wrote. "The policy is insufficiently clear as to what conduct is prohibited and invites arbitrary and discriminatory enforcement."

According to news reports, the players attended a house party where parents were present. Despite calling their parents to pick them up once they learned alcohol was being consumed by underage party-goers, the girls were placed on "social probation" by the school, barring them from participating in sports or other activities for three weeks. School policy allows administrators to discipline students "deemed to be 'in possession'" of alcohol, even if the student is only in the presence of it.

Calling the policy ridiculous as it would prevent students from attending weddings or other events where alcohol is present, Dave Flanagan, attorney for the students, applauded the court's decision.

"They were very excited, that’s for sure,” Flanagan told reporters. The girls were allowed back on the ice in time to play in a big game, which they ultimately won, advancing them to the semi-finals.

Source: Boston.com

Question of the Week   
In which one of the following years did Grand Central in New York City open to the public?
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Quote of the Day   
 
"How will the plague affect this season's campaigns? Let's count the ways.Governing itself is an indoor affair and a behind-the-scenes matter, but running for office is a true contact sport, involving flesh pressed and hands shaken, babies adored at close range, people massing in rallies (the bigger, the better), running mates embracing each other in moments of triumph, and young people taking time…[more]
 
 
—Noemie Emery, Washington Examiner
— Noemie Emery, Washington Examiner
 
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