From realistic climatologist Bjorn Lomborg, writing in The Wall Street Journal this week, a jarring…
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Statistic of the Day: Going Carbon-Free Would Cost Every American $11,300 PER YEAR

From realistic climatologist Bjorn Lomborg, writing in The Wall Street Journal this week, a jarring analysis of the cost of imposing the Biden/Pelosi/Schumer/AOC carbon-free "Green New Deal" agenda for every American annually:

 

A new study in Nature finds that a 95% reduction in American carbon emissions by 2050 will annually cost 11.9% of U.S. gross domestic product. To put that in perspective: Total expenditure on Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid came to 11.6% of GDP in 2019. The annual cost of trying to hit Mr. Biden’s target will rise to $4.4 trillion by 2050. That’s more than everything the federal government is projected to take in this year in tax revenue. It breaks down to $11,300 per person per year, or almost 500 times more than what a majority of Americans…[more]

October 15, 2021 • 12:33 PM

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Home Press Room CFIF Joins Coalition Opposing the BRIDGE Act, Legislation that Would Fail to Close Digital Divide
CFIF Joins Coalition Opposing the BRIDGE Act, Legislation that Would Fail to Close Digital Divide Print
Wednesday, June 30 2021

 ALEXANDRIA, VA  The Center for Individual Freedom (CFIF) today joined a coalition of nearly two dozen free-market organizations on a letter opposing the Broadband Reform and Investment to Drive Growth in the Economy (BRIDGE) Act, introduced by Senators Michael Bennet (D-Colorado), Rob Portman (R-Ohio) and Angus King (I-Maine). The legislation would represent a massive government intrusion into the broadband marketplace while failing to address the root causes of the digital divide, that percentage of Americans who truly lack access to high-speed internet. 

CFIF President Jeffrey Mazzella released the following statement:

“Every American should have access to high-speed internet, but the BRIDGE Act would fall far short of achieving that goal. The legislation’s priority seems to be promoting government-owned-and-operated broadband networks rather than pursuing commonsense, bipartisan policies that would actually get more Americans online. Policymakers should focus instead on partnering with the private sector to bring networks to areas that truly lack them, especially in rural America, and making broadband more affordable for low-income families. 

“Pursuing redundant network builds in areas that already have good broadband access, as the BRIDGE Act would do, is a waste of taxpayer dollars. The legislation also misses an opportunity to streamline permitting and other regulations that needlessly drive up the cost of broadband deployment. 

“We urge lawmakers to set aside ideologically driven distractions like government-run networks and focus on the real task at hand: connecting more Americans who legitimately lack access to high speed internet.”

Read the coalition letter, which was organized by Taxpayers Protection Alliance, here.

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