From our friends at the Senate Joint Economic Committee (JEC), another helpful perspective on how President…
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Image of the Day: Another View of Those Helped in Trump Economy

From our friends at the Senate Joint Economic Committee (JEC), another helpful perspective on how President Trump's economic agenda has helped those who need it most, in contrast to his predecessor who only claimed his policies pursued that end:

. [caption id="" align="alignleft" width="588"] Trump Economy Boosts Those Most In Need[/caption]

.  …[more]

January 28, 2020 • 09:55 am

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Jester's CourtroomLegal tales stranger than stranger than fiction: Ridiculous and sometimes funny lawsuits plaguing our courts.
Home Jester's Courtroom Some Lawsuits Just Stink
Some Lawsuits Just Stink Print
Thursday, March 07 2019

A railroad company has filed a lawsuit defending its right to terminate an employee who admitted that during a train stop he defecated on a knuckle that joins a locomotive and box car.

According to news reports, Union Pacific terminated the engineer for his actions, which also included throwing a feces-covered tissue out the window of the locomotive, informing his manager that he left a "present" for him, and extending his middle finger twice to a security camera on the train. After the engineer accepted "full and complete responsibility for his actions," Union Pacific terminated him under a rule that prohibits conduct that is "negligent, insubordinate, dishonest, immoral, quarrelsome or discourteous."

Following the termination, the union representing the engineer appealed. Following the denial of its appeal, the matter was sent to an arbitrator, who ruled the termination was "excessive discipline" and said the railroad should have required the employee to undergo a medical psychological evaluation.

In its recent lawsuit, the railroad is seeking to have the arbitrator's finding set aside on grounds the arbitrator exceeded his authority, and its seeking payment of its court costs and "any other relief the court deems just and proper."

Source: journalstar.com

Question of the Week   
How many States have adopted “red flag” laws to temporarily limit the possession of firearms?
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Quote of the Day   
 
"Harvard Law School Professor Alan Dershowitz, delivering a spirited constitutional defense of President Trump at his Senate impeachment trial Monday night, flatly turned toward House impeachment managers and declared they had picked 'dangerous' and 'wrong' charges against the president -- noting that neither 'abuse of power' nor 'obstruction of Congress' was remotely close to an impeachable offense…[more]
 
 
—Gregg Re, FOX News
— Gregg Re, FOX News
 
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