The U.S. travel technology firm Sabre may not ring an immediate bell, and perhaps you’ve not yet heard…
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On Sabre/Farelogix Merger, DOJ Mustn’t Undertake a Misguided Antitrust Boondoggle

The U.S. travel technology firm Sabre may not ring an immediate bell, and perhaps you’ve not yet heard of its proposed acquisition of Farelogix, but it looms as one of the most important antitrust cases to approach trial since AT&T/Time-Warner. The transaction’s most significant aspect is the way in which it offers a perfect illustration of overzealous bureaucratic antitrust enforcement, and the way that can delay and also punish American consumers. Specifically, the transaction enhances rather than inhibits market competition, and will benefit both travelers and the travel industry by accelerating innovation.  That’s in part because Sabre and Farelogix aren’t head-to-head market competitors, but rather complementary businesses.  While Sabre serves customers throughout the…[more]

January 13, 2020 • 03:53 pm

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Wednesday, August 21 2019

A former employee of Robert De Niro’s production studio is being sued for millions of dollars after being accused of abusing company time and misappropriating funds.

According to news sources, De Niro's Canal Productions has filed a $6 million suit against Chase Robinson, claiming the employee hired by De Niro in 2008 as an assistant, and later became vice-president of production and finance, binge-watched Netflix during work hours, ordered takeout on the company’s dime, and caused general financial mayhem. The lawsuit accuses Robinson of "breaching her fiduciary duties, [violating] the faithless service doctrine and conversion."

Remarkably, Robinson is accused of “binge-watching astounding hours of TV shows on Netflix.” The lawsuit claims that, “over the 4-day period between Tuesday, January 8 and Friday, January 11, 2019, 55 episodes of ‘Friends’ were accessed.” Allegedly Robinson then watched 32 episodes of Friends on a single Saturday and binged watched 20 episodes of Arrested Development and ten episodes of Schitt's Creek.

“Watching shows on Netflix was not in any way part of or related to the duties and responsibilities of Robinson’s employment and, on information and belief, was done for her personal entertainment, amusement and pleasure at times when she was being paid to work,” the lawsuit mentioned.

Robinson, who recently resigned from her six-figure position, reportedly charged to the company credit card $8,923.20 at Dean and Deluca and Whole Foods, $32,000 for Ubers and taxis and $12,696.65 at the Madison Avenue restaurant Paola’s, over a two-year period. Robinson also allegedly used 3 million of De Niro’s frequent flyer miles for personal trips and vacations and transferred 5 million miles to her personal account, at a total estimated value of $125,000.

Source: Rollingstone.com

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"Federal prosecutors are scrutinizing whether former FBI Director James Comey leaked classified information about a possible Russian disinformation campaign to journalists, according to a bombshell New York Times report.The inquiry, which kicked off in recent months, appears to focus on information from documents that Dutch intelligence obtained from Russian computers and provided to the U.S. government…[more]
 
 
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