Timothy Lee, CFIF's Senior Vice President for Legal and Public Affairs, discusses the 1951 federal Wire…
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Podcast: Will Congress the Dice to Prohibit Internet Gambling?

Timothy Lee, CFIF's Senior Vice President for Legal and Public Affairs, discusses the 1951 federal Wire Act, internet sports betting and the history of state regulation of gambling across the country.

Listen to the interview here.…[more]

April 21, 2017 • 01:23 pm

Liberty Update

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Jester's CourtroomLegal tales stranger than stranger than fiction: Ridiculous and sometimes funny lawsuits plaguing our courts.
Notable Quotes
 
On ObamaCare Repeal and Replace:
 
 

"House Republicans are reportedly ready to return any day now to health-insurance reform after the spectacular failure in late March of the American Health Care Act, the resoundingly unpopular bill to 'replace' the long-unpopular and misnamed Affordable Care Act. This time, they need to deliver: After seven years of promises to repeal Obamacare root and branch, the party can't go back to the voters with nothing more than a participation trophy. ...

"Most all of us have our own preferences for a better health-insurance system. But the path of conservative wisdom and political reality suggests that Republicans need to find a way to enact reforms that are incremental, modest, tested by experience, and sustainable, but also subject to modification over time. Ironically, the nature of the political process in Washington may require a bold and dramatic stroke in order to create the conditions for that kind of lawmaking. But doing so would send a powerful message that the business-as-usual of the past few decades (in which each side has sought to impose unilateral and sweeping changes by means of massive legislation) has given way to a system that looks more like how laws are supposed to be made: one step at a time."

 
 
— Dan McLaughlin, Esq., National Review OnLine Contributing Columnist
— Dan McLaughlin, Esq., National Review OnLine Contributing Columnist
Posted April 21, 2017 • 07:36 am
 
 
On Trump Tax Cuts and Congressional Delays:
 
 

"We started worrying in early February when House Speaker Paul Ryan put tax cuts on the back burner. We're more worried now that Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin has admitted Congress won't get the job done before it goes on recess in August.

"How many deadlines will they miss? A few more, and the delays may add up to failure.

"Yes, President Trump can do a lot without Congress on fronts such as deregulation -- but the main payoff there is long-term. The US economy needs a push now. ...

"In Wednesday's New York Times, Larry Kudlow, Steve Moore, Steve Forbes and Arthur Laffer echoed points made in these pages by Betsy McCaughey several weeks ago: At this point, the best bet is to do corporate-tax reform now. Put off the more complicated battles (including the confusing 'border adjustment tax') for later. ...

"The voters chose the guy who promised to deliver jobs, and nobody thought that meant 'sometime in 2018.'"

 
 
— New York Post Editorial Board
— New York Post Editorial Board
Posted April 20, 2017 • 07:21 am
 
 
On the Rot of Political Correctness:
 
 

"In today's academy, truth is an invention. Expecting people to show up on time is racist. Censorship is good. Silencing opposing viewpoints imperative. Violence to enforce safety is natural.

"For the last 25 years, under the guise of 'political correctness,' we've been watching the inexplicable flow into our culture. The idiotic demands of political correctness in the 1980s, ironically relying on the decency of the American people for their acquiescence, was just the prep course, an amuse bouche before the main course of creating social chaos and destruction.

"It sounds dramatic, and it is, and it's also the only way the left maintains power -- brainwashing people into believing that social norms must be destroyed in order to create a more perfect society. From the ashes would emerge the great collective phoenix.

"Just ask the Soviet Union, Cambodia, Cuba and Venezuela how well that works out."

 
 
— Tammy Bruce, Radio Talk Show Host, Author and Political Commentator
— Tammy Bruce, Radio Talk Show Host, Author and Political Commentator
Posted April 19, 2017 • 08:34 am
 
 
Democrats' Try for an Upset in Georgia Sixth CD:
 
 

"Alpharetta, Ga. -- As we enter the final day of the special election to replace Representative Tom Price, the nation's attention is fixed on Georgia's sixth congressional district. Even at this late stage, the outcome of this race remains highly uncertain. But one thing is certain: The Democrat in the race has convinced much of the country that he will pull off the first big win for his party since the Republicans swept last November's elections. That candidate, 30-year-old Jon Ossoff, is a former Democratic staffer who has managed to rake in over $8 million in donations over the course of the race. Heading into Election Day, Ossoff appears to be playing with the house's money. He has come out on top of his Republican rivals in every poll for the past two months, and surveys indicate that he led the two weeks of early voting by a wide margin. Here, one hears a common refrain: 'Could he really do it?'

"Perhaps. Nevertheless, the format of this race will make it difficult for Ossoff to manage an outright victory tonight. Because neither party held a primary, the race features a total of 18 candidates. If no candidate reaches 50 percent of the vote, the top two candidates will face each other in a runoff in June. ...

"The district's long history as a Republican stronghold also seems to suggest that Ossoff will have a tough time snatching this seat from the GOP. Georgia's sixth congressional district -- which is made up of the eastern part of Cobb County, as well as the northern parts of Fulton and DeKalb counties -- has been represented by a Republican for nearly four decades straight, since 1979. For about two of those decades, the district's congressman was Newt Gingrich; he was followed by Johnny Isakson (who is now one of Georgia's two senators), and then Price. None of these candidates ever had any difficulty holding on to the seat."

Read entire piece here

 
 
— Alexandra DeSanctis, National Review Institute William F. Buckley Fellow in Political Journalism
— Alexandra DeSanctis, National Review Institute William F. Buckley Fellow in Political Journalism
Posted April 18, 2017 • 07:58 am
 
 
On the State of U.S. Combat Readiness:
 
 

"American armed forces consistently perform so well that their effectiveness is taken for granted. Complaints about military spending cuts during the Obama years are such a cliche that they have been yawned at by our political leaders and completely ignored by the media.

But those years have taken us from cliche to crisis. Three factors have combined to create an emergency in airpower. First is the wear and tear imposed by nearly 16 years of combat. Second are with the massive, reckless cuts in defense spending imposed by President Obama which, under the Budget Control Act of 2011, are scheduled to continue for at least four years. Third is the near-criminal neglect of our forces by Mr. Obama's generals and admirals. As a result, so many of our combat aircraft are incapable of flying combat missions that the president is deprived of options that may be critical to any war, large or small. ...

The president should view this as an 'all hands on deck' emergency. Mr. Trump should call in the military leaders -- the Obama-era generals who have let our forces decay to their current perilous state -- and read them the riot act. Those who supported the decay in readiness by action or inaction should be fired.

The president should send to Congress a request for an immediate supplemental appropriations to return our forces to readiness. It will take at least two years -- the time it takes for manufacturers to supply repair parts and build new aircraft -- to fix the problem. It will take even longer to make up for the shortage of pilots in both the Air Force and the Navy.

There is no excuse for the military or Congress to let our Air Force and Navy airpower to continue to fail the readiness test. Our forces need the ability to fight anywhere, anytime. Right now, they can't."

 
 
— Jed Babbin, Former Defense Department Deputy Undersecretary and Senior Fellow of the London Center for Policy Research
— Jed Babbin, Former Defense Department Deputy Undersecretary and Senior Fellow of the London Center for Policy Research
Posted April 17, 2017 • 07:48 am
 
 
On the McConnell Method as a Strategy for a Republican Era:
 
 

"Senator McConnell's success in getting Neil Gorsuch confirmed to the Supreme Court is a reminder that there's no limit to what can be accomplished in Washington if conservatives don't waste their time worrying about what the liberal press says about them.

"Speaker Ryan may want to pay attention. Senator McConnell's Supreme Court success offers a potentially useful template for Republicans to handle health care and tax reform. ...

"The Garland-Gorsuch episode is an argument for not letting the left-wing outrage factory drive the Congressional agenda. Mr. McConnell's basic message about the Supreme Court vacancy was that we're going to have an election and then do what the voters wanted us to do, no matter how unpopular it is with PBS or the New York Times editorial board. The approach worked out so well with the court nomination that perhaps it will embolden Republicans to experiment with a similar strategy on other issues."

 
 
— Ira Stoll, New York Sun
— Ira Stoll, New York Sun
Posted April 14, 2017 • 07:41 am
 
 
On HRC's Reaction to Bombing Syria:
 
 

"Even Hillary Clinton hopped aboard the Trump Train for bombing Syria. Her only complaint seemed to be that Mr. Trump may not have gone far enough.

"'I believe that we should have, and still should, take out his airfields and prevent him from being able to use them to bomb innocent people and drop sarin gas on them,' she said.

"This is the same Hillary Clinton who warned us in the most alarming terms during the campaign that under no circumstances should Mr.Trump be trusted with America's war-making arsenal.

"'This is not someone who should ever have the nuclear codes,' she said last summer. 'It's not hard to imagine Donald Trump leading us into a war just because somebody got under his very thin skin.'

"Well, apparently Syrian dictator Bashar Assad got under Mr. Trump's very thin skin, and Mrs. Clinton's only complaint now is he didn't go far enough."

 
 
— Charles Hurt, The Washington Times
— Charles Hurt, The Washington Times
Posted April 13, 2017 • 07:46 am
 
 
On Identity Politics, Progressive Hobbyhorses and the ‘March for Science’:
 
 

"Ah, science. If you're even loosely engaged in the wild and dark art that is politics these days, you know by now that 'science,' as a word, has taken on an almost mystical meaning. 'Science,' in many of its modern incantations, now serves as a form of code, as vague and fuzzy as a Wiccan chant. For a growing number of political activists, the meaning is simple: Science, you see, is a lively mix of standard progressive hobbyhorses, tossed wild-eyed and cranky into one cantankerous bag.

"Witness the upcoming March for Science, scheduled for Saturday, April 22. This also happens to be Earth Day, which is nice enough -- and hey, who could object to a good old-fashioned rah-rah session for science? I, for one, always welcome a refresher on string theory, or the confounding conflict between the general theory of relativity and quantum mechanics, or that long, troubling episode in our planet's history when a few impertinent continents apparently traipsed all the way over to the other side of the globe and no one was there to panic about it.

"Alas, this March for Science does not appear to be largely about science, or about people who know a great deal about science, or even about people who want to know a great deal about science. (It would be kind of fun, in fact, to quiz earnest potential attendees about the details of the scientific method, or whether Johannes Kepler should finally win that well-deserved Oscar.) Keeping up with today's hottest trends, the March for Science has wrapped itself in identity politics, cranked up the oven to 'scorch,' and potentially set things on track to unceremoniously collapse into one giant intersectional souffle."

 
 
— Heather Wilhelm, National Review
— Heather Wilhelm, National Review
Posted April 12, 2017 • 07:39 am
 
 
On the Poisonous Ideology of Identity Politics:
 
 

"At this point, it's safe to say that Nimrata Randhawa has a far, far better chance to be the first female president of the United States than Hillary Clinton. But here's the question: When or if Nimrata (she goes by 'Nikki') -- a conservative, Indian-American daughter of immigrants who married Michael Haley, became governor of South Carolina, and is now the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations -- wins a presidential election, will Hillary's friends and supporters hail Haley's ascension to the White House as a tremendous achievement for women? Will the fans of intersectional feminism laud the ultimate success of a woman of color?

"Not likely. At this point, we all know the drill. There is one way and one way only for women -- especially black or brown women -- to take a true step forward, and that's through progressive politics. Identity politics works like this: Progressives do everything in their power to explicitly and unequivocally stoke race-and gender-related resentments and grievances. Any pushback against identity politics is labeled denialism at best and racism or sexism at worst. Progressive ideas are so self-evidently superior that opposition is best explained as grounded in misogyny or the always-reliable 'fear of change.' Opposition, even from women and even from people of color, is proof of the awful and enduring power of sexism and white supremacy.

"It's a poisonous ideology, it's straining our national unity, and this week Hillary once again did her best to push its narrative right back in our national face."

 
 
— David French, National Review
— David French, National Review
Posted April 11, 2017 • 07:34 am
 
 
On the U.S. Missile Strike in Syria:
 
 

"Last week's missile strike on a Syrian airfield in retaliation for a vicious chemical weapons attack will not make it any easier to solve the Syrian quagmire, but it was the right thing to do.

"Dictator Bashar al-Assad has repeatedly attacked his own people over the past six years of that three-sided civil war. Last week's attack on a rebel-held town, reportedly with sarin gas, killed at least 86 civilians.

"It also made a mockery of the Obama administration's boasts that Assad has surrendered his chemical weapons stockpiles.

"President Donald Trump's decision that the use of chemical weapons presents a clear threat to American interests provided the legal justification for the attack, which is sufficient given the degree to which Congress has surrendered its war powers over the past half century."

Read entire article here

 
 
— The Editors, New Hampshire Union Leader
— The Editors, New Hampshire Union Leader
Posted April 10, 2017 • 07:23 am
 
Question of the Week   
Which one of the following decades saw the origin of individual income taxes in the U.S.?
More Questions
Quote of the Day   
 
"House Republicans are reportedly ready to return any day now to health-insurance reform after the spectacular failure in late March of the American Health Care Act, the resoundingly unpopular bill to 'replace' the long-unpopular and misnamed Affordable Care Act. This time, they need to deliver: After seven years of promises to repeal Obamacare root and branch, the party can't go back to the voters…[more]
 
 
—Dan McLaughlin, Esq., National Review OnLine Contributing Columnist
— Dan McLaughlin, Esq., National Review OnLine Contributing Columnist
 
Liberty Poll   

In light of current international threat levels, do you believe Congress will sufficiently fund the U.S. military to begin replenishing necessary major equipment shortages?