We at CFIF have steadfastly highlighted the consumer benefits of the proposed T-Mobile/Sprint merger…
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WSJ Urges Regulators to Approve T-Mobile/Sprint Merger

We at CFIF have steadfastly highlighted the consumer benefits of the proposed T-Mobile/Sprint merger, and cautioned the federal government against any pointless and destructive objection to the deal.  In today's Wall Street Journal, its editorial board encourages the Department of Justice (DOJ) to move forward on the deal:

The Justice Department lost its lawsuit to block AT&T's purchase of Time Warner.  Yet now the antitrust cops are holding up T-Mobile's merger with Sprint even though it could give AT&T more competition in wireless.  What gives?

A year ago, T-Mobile announced plans to acquire Sprint for $26 billion in stock, yet the merger is still stuck in government antitrust purgatory.  The Federal Communications Commission keeps pausing its 180-day shot clock on the merger…[more]

April 22, 2019 • 04:07 pm

Liberty Update

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Jester's CourtroomLegal tales stranger than stranger than fiction: Ridiculous and sometimes funny lawsuits plaguing our courts.
Notable Quotes
 
On Cracking Down on Visa 'Overstays':
 
 

"President Donald Trump opened a new flank in his battle against illegal immigration on Monday when he ordered his administration to crack down on 'visa overstays' -- foreigners who legally enter the country but remain in the U.S. after their visas expire.

The president signed a memorandum ordering the secretary of state and the secretary of homeland security to submit plans within four months to crack down on overstays, such as punishing countries whose citizens have high rates of overstays and requiring foreign travelers to post 'admission bonds' that would be repaid once they leave the country.

The order is the latest example of Trump's renewed push on immigration, following a shakeup of the Department of Homeland Security and his increasing frustration with the rising number of Central American migrants entering the country.

Members of both parties have long complained that overstays are just as problematic as undocumented immigrants who cross the southern border. More than 1.2 million foreigners overstayed their visas from 2016 to 2017, according to the most recent Homeland Security data."

 
 
— Alan Gomez, USA TODAY
— Alan Gomez, USA TODAY
Posted April 24, 2019 • 08:09 am
 
 
On the Democrat Divide Over Impeachment:
 
 

"The credibility of the Democratic Party is now at issue.

"If Mueller could not find collusion, what reason is there to believe Rep. Jerry Nadler's judiciary committee will find it, and then convince the country that they have discovered what ex-FBI Director Mueller could not.

"With conspiracy and collusion off the table, and Mueller saying the case for obstruction is unproven, the renewed attack on Trump takes on the aspect of a naked and desperate 'deep state'-media coup against a president they fear they cannot defeat at the ballot box."

 
 
— Patrick J. Buchanan, Syndicated Columnist and The American Conservative Magazine Founding Editor
— Patrick J. Buchanan, Syndicated Columnist and The American Conservative Magazine Founding Editor
Posted April 23, 2019 • 08:06 am
 
 
On Ukraine Electing a Populist Celebrity:
 
 

"'The people want someone to articulate their rage for them,' says the fictional network programmer played by Faye Dunaway in the 1976 movie classic Network. She then unleashes on audiences a newscaster named Howard Beale, who electrifies the country with his manta 'I'm mad as hell, and I'm not going to take it anymore.'

"Increasingly, voters are plumping for reality-TV stars to express their anger and seek solutions to intractable problems. Donald Trump, who used his NBC show The Apprentice to catapult himself into the White House, is the most obvious example. But look at Ukraine: This nation of 44 million people just saw a comedian who plays a fictional Ukrainian president on TV win 73 percent of the vote and become, as of today, the president-elect."

Read entire article here.

 
 
— John Fund, National Review
— John Fund, National Review
Posted April 22, 2019 • 07:30 am
 
 
On Easter:
 
 

Happy Easter to you, your family and friends!

 
 
— From Everyone at CFIF
— From Everyone at CFIF
Posted April 19, 2019 • 08:00 am
 
 
On Bernie Sanders' 2020 Presidential Run:
 
 

"The clever people in the Democratic party have turned their attention to Senator Bernie Sanders, the creepy Brooklyn red who for some reason represents Vermont in the Senate, functionally as a member of the Democratic party, an equally creepy political organization to which he does not belong but whose presidential nomination he nonetheless is seeking a second time.

"Stop Sanders! is the cry of the moment from Cambridge, Mass., to Tiburon, Calif., and everywhere that clever Democrats gather. The worry is that Senator Sanders's grumpy-Muppet shtick will not discreetly charm the bourgeoisie, that his disheveled populism and his unmade bed of a mind will not be a smash hit with well-heeled swing voters in the moneyed suburbs of Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Michigan, and Florida -- which, the clever people inform us, is where the real action is going to be in 2020. They aren't out there screaming 'A vote for Sanders is a vote for Trump!' just yet, but they are scheming behind the scenes, and the moneymen of the party already are so alarmed that they are making approximately the same sound that Donald Sutherland makes at the end of Invasion of the Body Snatchers."

 
 
— Kevin D. Williamson, National Review
— Kevin D. Williamson, National Review
Posted April 18, 2019 • 08:00 am
 
 
On Leveraging Facebook Data:
 
 

"Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg oversaw plans to consolidate the social network's power and control competitors by treating its users' data as a bargaining chip, while publicly proclaiming to be protecting that data, according to about 4,000 pages of leaked company documents largely spanning 2011 to 2015 and obtained by NBC News.

"The documents, which include emails, webchats, presentations, spreadsheets and meeting summaries, show how Zuckerberg, along with his board and management team, found ways to tap Facebook's trove of user data -- including information about friends, relationships and photos -- as leverage over companies it partnered with.

"In some cases, Facebook would reward favored companies by giving them access to the data of its users. In other cases, it would deny user-data access to rival companies or apps."

Read entire article here.

 
 
— Olivia Solon and Cyrus Farivar, NBC News
— Olivia Solon and Cyrus Farivar, NBC News
Posted April 17, 2019 • 07:59 am
 
 
On the Obama Administration’s Plan to Spy on the Trump Campaign:
 
 

"There is no doubt that the Obama administration spied on the Trump campaign. As Barr made clear, the real question is: What predicated the spying? Was there a valid reason for it, strong enough to overcome our norm against political spying? Or was it done rashly? Was a politically motivated decision made to use highly intrusive investigative tactics when a more measured response would have sufficed, such as a 'defensive briefing' that would have warned the Trump campaign of possible Russian infiltration?

"Last year, when the 'spy' games got underway, James Clapper, Obama's director of national intelligence, conceded that, yes, the FBI did run an informant -- 'spy' is such an icky word -- at Trump campaign officials; but, we were told, this was merely to investigate Russia. Cross Clapper's heart, it had nothing to do with the Trump campaign. No, no, no. Indeed, the Obama administration only used an informant because -- bet you didn't know this -- doing so is the most benign, least intrusive mode of conducting an investigation. ...

"The fact that spying had occurred was too clear for credible denial. The retort, then, was misdirection: There had been no spying on Donald Trump or his campaign; just on a few potential bad actors in the campaign's orbit.

"It was nonsense then, and it is nonsense now."

Read entire article here.

 
 
— Andrew C. McCarthy, National Review Contributing Editor, Legal Commentator, Terrorism Expert and Former Federal Prosecutor
— Andrew C. McCarthy, National Review Contributing Editor, Legal Commentator, Terrorism Expert and Former Federal Prosecutor
Posted April 16, 2019 • 07:30 am
 
 
On Ethanol's Role in Rising Gas Prices:
 
 

"Ethanol is an alcohol made from plants, mostly corn in the U.S. In addition to getting you drunk, it can act as a fuel additive. You've probably noticed those signs on gas pumps informing you that your gasoline contains 10% ethanol. That means your gasoline is less efficient and will slowly wreck your motorcycle, boat, and lawnmower.

"So, why do refiners put ethanol in your gasoline? Because the federal government requires it. The federal ethanol mandate created by President George W. Bush (officially the Renewable Fuel Standard) was a sop to the ethanol lobby, which wields extra clout thanks to prominence of the Iowa caucuses.The floods across the Midwest have overwhelmed roads and rails and thus trapped millions of barrels of ethanol in the heartland. In a sane world, this wouldn't harm drivers who just want some regular old gasoline.

"But thanks to the Renewable Fuel Standard, it's effectively illegal to sell gasoline without ethanol in it.

"Supply curtailed by nature, demand legislated by Congress -- blend them together, and you get $4 a gallon in San Francisco and sharply climbing prices in most of the country."

 
 
— The Editors, Washington Examiner
— The Editors, Washington Examiner
Posted April 15, 2019 • 08:05 am
 
 
On Preventing Comey-Style Spy Abuses At FBI:
 
 

"Elise Stefanik, a Republican lawmaker who sits on the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, introduced legislation Wednesday that would require the FBI director to promptly inform Congress when investigations of candidates for federal office are undertaken by federal law enforcement or intelligence authorities.

"Two years ago, when then-FBI Director James Comey finally notified Congress that he'd opened up a counterintelligence investigation of the Trump campaign the previous year, some members were deeply troubled. Not only was the FBI director not supposed to hide his counterintelligence work from a key group of congressional members who receive his briefings, he was supposed to notify them in particular about politically sensitive probes. ...

"The Trump-Russia probe from the 2016 campaign touched off a massive scandal that included wiretaps of private citizens, weaponization of campaign-funded opposition research, the deployment of overseas intelligence assets against American citizens, and allegations that America's top law enforcement and intelligence officials were attempting a soft coup of the duly-elected president of the United States. That probe, thanks to strategic leaks from intelligence officials, then folded into Special Counsel Robert Mueller's sprawling two-year-long investigation. It resulted in zero charges related to collusion or conspiracy with Russia to steal the election from Hillary Clinton."

 
 
— Mollie Hemingway, The Federalist
— Mollie Hemingway, The Federalist
Posted April 12, 2019 • 07:46 am
 
 
On Whether Spying Occurred on the Trump Campaign:
 
 

"Democrats and some in the media expressed shock and outrage when Attorney General William Barr said Wednesday that 'spying did occur' on the Trump campaign during the 2016 election.

"Barr 'must retract his statement immediately or produce specific evidence to back it up,' Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer said. 'Perpetuating conspiracy theories is beneath the office of the attorney general.'

"Barr has gone 'off the rails,' said House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. ...

"Cable news commentators called Barr's statement 'stunning' and appeared baffled that the attorney general would make such a claim 'without evidence.'

"The baffling thing was why they were baffled. Barr's statement was accurate and supported by publicly known facts."

Read entire article here.

 
 
— Byron York, Washington Examiner Chief Political Correspondent
— Byron York, Washington Examiner Chief Political Correspondent
Posted April 11, 2019 • 07:29 am
 
Question of the Week   
How many times in our nation’s history has a presidential election been decided by the U.S. House of Representatives?
More Questions
Quote of the Day   
 
"President Donald Trump opened a new flank in his battle against illegal immigration on Monday when he ordered his administration to crack down on 'visa overstays' -- foreigners who legally enter the country but remain in the U.S. after their visas expire.The president signed a memorandum ordering the secretary of state and the secretary of homeland security to submit plans within four months to crack…[more]
 
 
—Alan Gomez, USA TODAY
— Alan Gomez, USA TODAY
 
Liberty Poll   

How likely are you to read all or a significant part of the Mueller Report?