From Forbes, our image of the day captures nicely the mainstream media's credibility problem, as their…
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Image of the Day: Mainstream Media's Evaporating Credibility

From Forbes, our image of the day captures nicely the mainstream media's credibility problem, as their cries of "Wolf!" accumulate.  Simultaneously, it captures how three institutions most intertwined with conservative values - the military, small business and police - remain atop the list of public esteem.

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[caption id="" align="alignleft" width="960"] Media's Evaporating Credibility[/caption]

 

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October 04, 2019 • 10:29 am

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Jester's CourtroomLegal tales stranger than stranger than fiction: Ridiculous and sometimes funny lawsuits plaguing our courts.
Jester’s Courtroom
Seven Not A Lucky Number
Wednesday, June 19 2019

A lawyer and his client have been ordered to pay more than $1 million in sanctions and penalties after filing as many as seven amended complaints against a condo association.

According to news reports, plaintiff Marshall Spiegel, through his attorney John Xydakis, sued his condo association, 1618 Sheridan Road Condominium Association. In February 2018, Cook County (IL) Judge Margaret Ann Brennan denied Spiegel’s request to file a 99-count, 223-page fifth amended complaint and later that year denied his motion to reconsider that ruling. In a second related case, Spiegel filed a lawsuit accusing the village of Wilmette of violating his constitutional rights by asking him to stop tracking his neighbors’ activities to prove they were violating condo association rules. A U.S. Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals panel issued an opinion earlier this year upholding the decision of U.S. District Judge Sara Ellis to dismiss that complaint.

Back in Cook County, Judge Brennan said Spiegel filed seven amended complaints against the condo association and a number of motions and noted three cases were consolidated into one action. Stating the “cases have a convoluted and torturous history,” Brennan said the claims included concerns such as “placement of empty water bottles in front of his doorway, voicemails left on his answering machine, lawn furniture purchased for common areas, neighbors hiding in the bushes … and association bylaws that prohibit Spiegel from having shirtless massages next to the pool.”

Several entities pursued sanctions under Illinois Supreme Court Rule 137, which Brennan granted, noting “Xydakis filed claims against nearly every resident” of the condo and “without any factual basis … alleged serious offenses, including theft, slander, harassment and stalking.”

“Spiegel and Xydakis have shown complete disregard for the judicial process through their egregious conduct,” Brennan added.

Source: cookcountyrecord.com

Getting Schooled on the Law
Thursday, June 13 2019

A former college professor is suing Marvel Studios and the Walt Disney World Company, claiming he is the original author of the movie "Black Panther."

David Louis Whitehead, a former Wiley College professor, alleges that he submitted a film proposal to Netflix executives in November 2016 entitled "Black Batman." Despite being informed by executives on the day of the submission that they were not interested, Whitehead maintains Black Panther took elements from his submission. Marvel Studios counters that Black Panther was created in 1966 by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby.

"The film Black Panther has a nearly all black cast, with two white characters, with one of those characters depicted as CIA agent relating to the plot," Whitehead’s lawsuit reads. "In contrast, plaintiff’s script ‘Batman Blackman’ has an all-black cast and he worked at the CIA for nearly seven years."

Despite conceding that Netflix responded within minutes of his emailed transmission, denying the proposal, according to news reports Whitehead "interprets the immediate rejection as a clear indication of 'fraud and negligence and violations of privacy.'"

Marvel responds:

"To the extent his claims surround the creation and distribution of the movie 'Black Panther,' there is no question that the film was based on the Marvel Comic character created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby in the 1960s, long before Plaintiff submitted his 'proposal' to Netflix. Plaintiff’s allegations here are thus consistent with the fantastic allegations Plaintiff has raised over the past two decades against a myriad of entertainment entities."

Source: Breitbart.com

Loser Pays
Wednesday, June 05 2019

The Arizona Supreme Court has upheld a lower court's ruling requiring a Phoenix law firm to pay nearly $150,000 in legal fees over what the lower court concluded was unfounded litigation.

According to news reports, Statecraft LLC filed a lawsuit against the town of Snowflake and Copperstate Farms, a limited liability company that had received a special use permit from the municipality to grow marijuana in an existing greenhouse. Several residents, represented by Statecraft, filed suit, alleging, among other things, "illegal contract zoning."

Lower court Judge Donna Grimsley dismissed the case and ordered Statecraft to pay the legal fees roughly $40,000 to the town and $109,000 to Cooperstate. The appellate court upheld the decision, finding there was more than enough evidence the lawsuit should never have been filed.

"There is no public interest in a frivolous lawsuit, and discouraging groundless litigation is what the legislature intended," the appellate court concluded. Without comment, the Arizona Supreme Court declined to review the ruling.

Kory Langhofer, a Statecraft attorney, maintains the trial judge "simply got it wrong," warning of the implications of the Supreme Court's decision to leave the lower ruling intact, saying it "will inevitably chill thoughtful cases of first impression in Arizona courts."

Source: tucson.com

Not a Magical Experience
Wednesday, May 29 2019

A woman is suing Walt Disney World for unspecified damages in excess of $15,000 after being "dive-bombed" by a seasonal migrating bird at the popular resort.

Lisa Dixon of Celebration, Florida, claims she suffered a severe brain injury while walking along a dock at Disney's Polynesian Village Resort. According to news reports, the lawsuit alleges Disney knew that seasonal migrating birds were a threat to resort guests but refused to do anything about them or warn guests.

“If there’s a company that’s well-versed in safety, it should be Disney,” the woman’s lawyer, Thomas Schmitt, told reporters. “It’s changed her life."

Disney representatives countered that they plan to address Dixon's allegations in court.

Source: nypost.com

Watch Out for Bicyclists
Wednesday, May 15 2019

A Massachusetts man is being sued by a bicyclist after his Uber driver double parked in a bike lane, causing the vehicle door to trap the bicyclist when the rider was exiting his Uber ride.

Jake Lester opened the back door to get out of his Uber and in doing so a cyclist was pinned between the Uber and a parked car. The cyclist is now suing both Lester and the Uber driver for damages ($4,000 in medical bills) and fees.

"Obviously, I knew we were double parked but wasn't aware that we were parked in a bike lane," Lester said.

According to news reports, Lester, who didn't have a car and thus no insurance of his own, was surprised to learn he would not be covered under Uber's insurance policy. But Uber's insurance company - James River Insurance - sent him a letter denying him coverage saying, "You do not qualify as an insured under the James River policy... Opening a door into a bicylist does not constitute 'use' of a covered auto."

It's "just mind-blowing that they're taking a step back from this and saying they have no responsibility," Lester said.

Under Massachusetts law, rideshare companies are required to maintain a million dollars in liability insurance for "bodily injury to others" while their drivers are engaged in a ride. Uber maintains that Jake Lester isn't covered.

"It just seems ridiculous, frankly, for a company as big as Uber to deny a rider coverage like that," Lester said. "If I'm getting in an Uber, I'm putting my financial security at risk. Who knows what could happen and Uber's not going to provide the coverage."

Source: wcvb.com



Question of the Week   
What was the Big Apple called before it was named New York City by the British?
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Quote of the Day   
 
"A motion to censure House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., for his 'parody' reading of President Trump's July phone call with Ukrainian leader Volodymyr Zelensky during a hearing last month is gaining steam with House Republicans, as Fox News has learned 135 lawmakers have now signed on as co-sponsors.The resolution to censure Schiff -- who has become a favorite target of Republicans…[more]
 
 
—Andrew O'Reilly, Fox News
— Andrew O'Reilly, Fox News
 
Liberty Poll   

Do you agree or disagree with President Trump's decision to move American troops from northeast Syria prior to a Turkish military incursion into that region?