From Forbes, our image of the day captures nicely the mainstream media's credibility problem, as their…
CFIF on Twitter CFIF on YouTube
Image of the Day: Mainstream Media's Evaporating Credibility

From Forbes, our image of the day captures nicely the mainstream media's credibility problem, as their cries of "Wolf!" accumulate.  Simultaneously, it captures how three institutions most intertwined with conservative values - the military, small business and police - remain atop the list of public esteem.

.  

[caption id="" align="alignleft" width="960"] Media's Evaporating Credibility[/caption]

 

.  …[more]

October 04, 2019 • 10:29 am

Liberty Update

CFIFs latest news, commentary and alerts delivered to your inbox.
Jester's CourtroomLegal tales stranger than stranger than fiction: Ridiculous and sometimes funny lawsuits plaguing our courts.
Jester’s Courtroom
Now That's Scary
Wednesday, February 20 2019

A Pennsylvania woman and her teen daughter are suing an Allentown-area amusement park, claiming the park's costumed ghouls were too scary.

According to news reports, Shannon Sacco and her daughter are seeking more than $150,000 in damages against Dorney Park, Wildwater Kingdom and its parent company, Cedar Fair, after the girl visited the amusement park's haunted attraction and suffered a fall when a costumed employee ran up behind her and shouted in her ear. The family alleges the girl asked the ghouls to leave her alone because she didn't want to be scared and further claims the companies were negligent in their operation of the attraction, in part for failing to inform the girl she could buy a glow-in-the-dark "No Boo" necklace to ward off employees in monster costumes.

The lawsuit claims the girl allegedly had to undergo medical treatment, which may continue in the future, and that she has been unable to carry on her usual activities or hold a job.

Source: fox43.com

From One Figure to Nine Figures
Wednesday, February 13 2019

An app developer is suing Kim Kardashian, seeking a nine figure resolution, after claiming the reality star pushed him out of a deal for animated emojis and GIFs of the Kardsashian clan.

David Liebensohn is suing Kardashian for at least $100 million for breach of contract and fraud. According to news reports, Liebensohn and his business partners were contacted by Kardashian to develop animated emojis of Kardashian, called "Kimojis." Liebensohn claims Kardashian agreed to give him and his partners a 60 percent cut, but that she insisted on filing the trademark paperwork for "Kimoji." Shortly after filing for the trademark, Kardashian backed out of the deal, claiming one of Liebensohn's partners had shared some of her personal information. Liebensohn says Kardashian knew about the alleged sharing of the personal information before they struck the deal and that she later simply used it as an excuse to back out.

Kardashian's lawyer, Marty Singer, told news organizations that the "lawsuit filed against Kim Kardashian is ridiculous and absurd. The parties entered into a binding settlement agreement in 2014 in which Kim gave up multi-million dollar claims against Mr. Liebensohn and his partners. Mr. Liebensohn waited more than 4 years to claim the agreement wasn't binding on him. Kim commenced arbitration in December 2018, and after Mr. Liebensohn was unsuccessful in stopping the arbitration he filed this meritless lawsuit. We feel confident we will get the case dismissed."

Source: tmz.com

May I Have This Dance?
Thursday, February 07 2019

The mother of a boy affectionately known as "orange shirt kid" is suing Epic Games, the makers of the popular video game "Fortnite," for including her son’s awkward "orange justice" dance in the game.

According to news reports, the orange shirt kid submitted the dance to Epic Games as part of a dance contest called BoogieDown. After he did not win, Fortnite players convinced Epic Games to include the dance. Now, his mom is suing, even though the rules for the dance contest made it clear that all submissions could be used and that no one would be paid for use of a selected dance. Epic further contends the dance was also never sold, but instead given away as part of the free battle pass.

In the lawsuit, the boy’s mother, Rachel McCumbers, says that orange shirt kid exploded in popularity in or around early 2018 after he made a video of himself performing his dance called "the Random." The lawsuit further claims the dance is no longer called "the Random," but "Orange Justice." McCumbers is seeking unspecified damages.

Source: Variety.com

Louis Pooey
Wednesday, January 30 2019

There’s a fight going on over purses.

Toy maker MGA Entertainment Inc. is suing Louis Vuitton, challenging the luxury brand’s claim of trademark infringement.

MGA is the maker of Poopsie Pooey Puitton, a slime-kit housed in a poop-shaped carrying case decorated with pastel-colored symbols that are reminiscent of the monogram pattern on some Louis Vuitton bags. According to news reports, MGA says its product is protected as a parody "designed to mock, criticize, and make fun of that wealth and celebrity" associated with Louis Vuitton products.

"The use of the Pooey name and Pooey product in association with a product line of 'magical unicorn poop' is intended to criticize or comment upon the rich and famous, the Louis Vuitton name, the LV marks, and on their conspicuous consumption," the lawsuit said.

The company said it filed the lawsuit to “preemptively shut down any potential claims of trademark infringement that Louis Vuitton might lodge against it and/or any of the retailers stocking its popular toy,” adding that “no reasonable consumer” would mistake Pooey Puitton, which is made of plastic and retails for about $59.99, for Louis Vuitton’s handbags.

MGA is seeking a court declaration that Pooey Puitton does not infringe Louis Vuitton's intellectual property rights and is protected parody and fair use.

Source: bizjournals.com

Not So Instant Replay
Wednesday, January 23 2019

An attorney has filed a lawsuit against the NFL on behalf of New Orleans Saints' season-ticket holders following a missed call in last week's NFC title game.

Attorney Frank D'Amico, Jr., is demanding that the NFL invoke Rule 17, Section 2, Article 1 in the NFL Rule Rulebook that he says "could, in the right circumstances, allow the commissioner to take extreme action in the face of a grossly unfair result." The complaint stems from what many are calling an obvious missed pass interference call in the final minutes of the fourth quarter. The Saints had to settle for a field goal, resulting in a tie and overtime; ultimately, the Saints lost the game 26-23.

According to the lawsuit, D'Amico claims NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell has the power to reverse the outcome of the game and have the teams replay the finish of the contest from the point of the blatant missed pass inference call. "The petition filed by our office was not a petition for damages, but rather a petition for a Writ of Mandamus which seeks equitable relief and NOT monetary damages," D'Amico's firm's Facebook page notes.

Source: cbssports.com



Question of the Week   
What was the Big Apple called before it was named New York City by the British?
More Questions
Quote of the Day   
 
"A motion to censure House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., for his 'parody' reading of President Trump's July phone call with Ukrainian leader Volodymyr Zelensky during a hearing last month is gaining steam with House Republicans, as Fox News has learned 135 lawmakers have now signed on as co-sponsors.The resolution to censure Schiff -- who has become a favorite target of Republicans…[more]
 
 
—Andrew O'Reilly, Fox News
— Andrew O'Reilly, Fox News
 
Liberty Poll   

Do you agree or disagree with President Trump's decision to move American troops from northeast Syria prior to a Turkish military incursion into that region?