From Forbes, our image of the day captures nicely the mainstream media's credibility problem, as their…
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Image of the Day: Mainstream Media's Evaporating Credibility

From Forbes, our image of the day captures nicely the mainstream media's credibility problem, as their cries of "Wolf!" accumulate.  Simultaneously, it captures how three institutions most intertwined with conservative values - the military, small business and police - remain atop the list of public esteem.

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[caption id="" align="alignleft" width="960"] Media's Evaporating Credibility[/caption]

 

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October 04, 2019 • 10:29 am

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Jester's CourtroomLegal tales stranger than stranger than fiction: Ridiculous and sometimes funny lawsuits plaguing our courts.
Jester’s Courtroom
Here We Go Again
Thursday, April 04 2019

A single mother and teacher in California is suing 45 of the 50 people named in the Operation Varsity Blues college admissions scandal, including actresses Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin. This is the second lawsuit in a couple of weeks coming out of the scandal.

Jennifer Kay Toy has filed a federal lawsuit seeking $500 billion from the defendants she calls "heinous."

"I'm not a wealthy person, but even if I were wealthy I would not have engaged in the heinous and despicable actions of defendants," Kay Toy said in her lawsuit. "I'm outraged and hurt because I feel that my son, my only child, was denied access to a college not because he failed to work and study hard enough, but because wealthy individuals felt that it was OK to lie, cheat, steal and bribe their children's way into a good college."

Kay Toy alleged in the lawsuit that her son, Joshua Toy, who applied to some of the colleges where the cheating took place, was overlooked in favor of people who had wealth and influence.

"I'm now aware of the massive cheating scandal wherein wealthy people conspired with people in positions of power and authority at colleges in order to allow their children to gain access to the very colleges that Joshua was rejected from," Toy claimed in the lawsuit. "Plaintiffs simply wanted a fair chance for themselves or their children to go to a good college, and that opportunity for a fair chance was stolen by the actions of the Defendants who feel that, because they are wealthy, they are allowed to lie, cheat and steal from others."

Source: Newsweek.com

Name Calling
Thursday, March 28 2019

The skies may be friendly, but maybe not the airports. Orlando International Airport’s owner, the Greater Orlando Aviation Authority (GOAA), has filed a lawsuit against Melbourne Airport Authority (MAA) for naming its airport Orlando Melbourne International Airport.

According to the lawsuit, GOAA claims the MAA is deliberately trying to mislead passengers and is promoting "unfair competition" by using the word "Orlando" in its name. GOAA is demanding "Orlando" be removed from the name and compensation be paid. For the record, neither airport is in the heart of the city: Orlando International is 12 miles outside of the city center; the smaller Orlando Melbourne International Airport is about 60 miles southeast of the larger airport and 70 miles from the city center.

Negotiations have been under way to resolve this matter since 2015 when the name was first used. The current lawsuit was recently filed after ongoing negotiations failed.

Attorneys for the GOAA wrote that: “Given the passenger volume of Orlando International Airport, its established reputation, extensive capital investments, superior customer service amenities, and its location in Orlando, one of the Nation’s top tourism destinations, it is obvious that MLB is attempting to use the Illegal Advertisements to confuse customers in order to divert business from Orlando International Airport and misappropriate GOAA’s established goodwill and brand recognition of the Orlando International Airport Trademark."

MAA counters that the argument has no merit. News reports indicate GOAA is using taxpayer money to fund the lawsuit.

Source: simpleflying.com

What’s a College Degree Worth These Days?
Thursday, March 21 2019

Two Stanford University students have filed a class action lawsuit against the eight universities named in the college admissions scandal, claiming their degrees from Stanford have been tarnished and that the rigged system of paying for admission denied students a fair chance to be enrolled at an elite university.

Stanford University, ranked #7 in US News & World Report rankings, is named along with USC, UCLA, the University of San Diego, the University of Texas at Austin, Wake Forest University, Yale University and Georgetown University. The class action lawsuit seeks damages for any student who applied to one or more of those universities and was rejected between 2012 and last year.

The named plaintiffs in this case, Stanford students Erica Olsen and Kalea Woods, both allege they were among those who were denied by elite schools named in the investigation. Olsen said she applied to Yale, paid a $80 application fee, and was denied admission, despite a nearly perfect SAT and ACT score and her extracurriculars. Olsen is a student at Stanford.

“Had she known that the system at Yale University was warped and rigged by fraud, she would not have spent the money to apply to the school,” the lawsuit states. “She also did not receive what she paid for — a fair admissions consideration process.”

Source: LATimes.com

Straight Out of a Seinfeld Episode?
Thursday, March 14 2019

A company is suing actor Jerry Seinfeld claiming it bought the comedian's 1958 Porsche only to discover it was a fake.

According to news reports, Fica Frio Limited paid $1.54 million for the vintage car that was allegedly owned by Seinfeld, now the host of the series "Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee." The auction brochure boasted that the car was "From the Jerry Seinfeld Collection." The company, which is located in the Channel Islands, filed the lawsuit after learning the car was not authentic.

According to the lawsuit, Seinfeld left a voicemail last June apologizing and promising a full refund. But it said the refund never came.

Seinfeld's lawyer, Orin Snyder, said the comedian acted in good faith and "is willing to do what's right and fair."

"He has asked Fica Frio for evidence to substantiate the allegations. Fica Frio ignored Jerry and instead filed this frivolous lawsuit," Snyder said in a statement.

Source: wlja.com

Some Lawsuits Just Stink
Thursday, March 07 2019

A railroad company has filed a lawsuit defending its right to terminate an employee who admitted that during a train stop he defecated on a knuckle that joins a locomotive and box car.

According to news reports, Union Pacific terminated the engineer for his actions, which also included throwing a feces-covered tissue out the window of the locomotive, informing his manager that he left a "present" for him, and extending his middle finger twice to a security camera on the train. After the engineer accepted "full and complete responsibility for his actions," Union Pacific terminated him under a rule that prohibits conduct that is "negligent, insubordinate, dishonest, immoral, quarrelsome or discourteous."

Following the termination, the union representing the engineer appealed. Following the denial of its appeal, the matter was sent to an arbitrator, who ruled the termination was "excessive discipline" and said the railroad should have required the employee to undergo a medical psychological evaluation.

In its recent lawsuit, the railroad is seeking to have the arbitrator's finding set aside on grounds the arbitrator exceeded his authority, and its seeking payment of its court costs and "any other relief the court deems just and proper."

Source: journalstar.com



Question of the Week   
Which one of the following is still remembered as the most infamous incident in American industrial history?
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Quote of the Day   
 
"Everyone who already thought the case for President Trump's impeachment was a slam-dunk went berserk Thursday, claiming that acting White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney had just admitted to a quid pro quo with Ukraine.Except that what Mulvaney 'admitted' is that the administration was doing what it should -- pushing a foreign government to cooperate in getting to the bottom of foreign interference…[more]
 
 
—The Editorial Board, New York Post
— The Editorial Board, New York Post
 
Liberty Poll   

Why do you think House Speaker Pelosi will not call a vote on formal impeachment proceedings?