In our Liberty Update commentary entitled "No, Scandinavia Doesn't Vindicate Socialism" this week, we…
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Image of the Day: Gallup Poll on Americans' View of Job Market Hits All-Time Record

In our Liberty Update commentary entitled "No, Scandinavia Doesn't Vindicate Socialism" this week, we rightly ridicule admitted socialist Bernie Sanders, including his odd claim that "we now have an economy that is fundamentally broke and grotesquely unfair."  Well, as this Gallup survey illustrates, he's swimming upstream against American public opinion.  Specifically, in a survey that Gallup has conducted periodically since 2001, the public's view of the job market has now hit an all-time record high:

. [caption id="" align="alignleft" width="720"] Sorry, Socialists[/caption]

 

. Perhaps this helps explain why Sanders has suddenly plummeted in 2020 Democratic candidate surveys, although one wonders how long people like Elizabeth Warren can avoid the same fate.

 …[more]

June 14, 2019 • 02:30 pm

Liberty Update

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Jester's CourtroomLegal tales stranger than stranger than fiction: Ridiculous and sometimes funny lawsuits plaguing our courts.
Jester’s Courtroom
I’m with the Band
Thursday, May 02 2019

James Dolan, CEO of Madison Square Garden (“MSG”) company, is being sued by a group of shareholders who claim he is overpaid, only works part-time, and spends too much of his time with his band, JD & the Straight Shot band. MSG company owns 14 brands, including the Knicks, the Rangers, Radio City Music Hall and the Rockettes.

According to news reports, the lawsuit argues Dolan allegedly made more than $75 million over a three-year period, far in excess of MSG’s peer companies, yet Dolan traveled and performed “extensively domestically and internationally” with his band. “By comparison, MSG’s peer companies paid their CEOs an average of $17 million for the same three-year period. The highest-paid peer CEO received $32.4 million, over $43 million less than James,” the complaint stated.

MSG says the lawsuit has been brought by a trust owned by one shareholder. In a statement issued by the company, MSG countered, “This lawsuit amounts to nothing more than corporate harassment. The company stands by its policies and practices.”

Source: nydailynews.com

Too Hot to Handle
Wednesday, April 24 2019

A Texas woman is suing restaurant chain Olive Garden claiming she suffered severe burns from a hot stuffed mushroom that became lodged in her throat.

Danny Howard of Fort Worth, Texas, is seeking $200,000 to $1 million in damages, alleging that Olive Garden was negligent in not warning her that the mushrooms were extremely hot. According to the lawsuit, there was no notification that the "mushrooms were particularly hot or (carried) the risk to cause severe burns."

Howard claims the hot mushroom got lodged in her throat, causing her to choke and stop breathing. Howard ultimately vomited up the mushroom. She later sought medical treatment.

Source: star-telegram.com

A Shot in the Dark
Monday, April 08 2019

A Kentucky judge has thrown out a lawsuit filed by an unvaccinated teenager who sued his local health department for temporarily barring students at his school who were not deemed immune against chickenpox.

Following an outbreak of chickenpox affecting roughly 13% of the student population at Our Lady of Sacred Heart/Assumption Academy in Walton, Kentucky, the Northern Kentucky Health Department announced that all students who did not have "proof of vaccination or proof of immunity against chickenpox will not be allowed to attend school until 21 days after the onset of rash for the last ill student or staff member."

According to news reports, the school's sports and extracurricular activities were canceled to avoid spreading the illness to other schools and places.

Jerome Kunkel, a senior basketball player at the school who refused the chickenpox vaccine for religious reasons, filed a lawsuit against the county. In late February, Kunkel was told he couldn't attend or play any upcoming basketball games because test results indicated he was not immune to chickenpox. Kunkel and his father said he was being discriminated against because of religious beliefs.

"The fact that I can't finish my senior year of basketball, like our last couple games is pretty devastating. I mean you go through four years of high school, playing basketball, but you look forward to your senior year," he told news agencies.

Kunkel had argued that missing weeks of school may have lifelong consequences and alleged that the health department had "acted in retaliation for his exercise of his religious beliefs." The health department responded that it had ordered the temporary ban because of the chickenpox outbreak, not because he wasn't vaccinated.

Boone County Circuit Judge James Schrand rejected Kunkel's request to prevent the health department from enforcing its school and activities ban.

"The Court's ruling ... underscores the critical need for Public Health Departments to preserve the safety of the entire community, and in particular the safety of those members of our community who are most susceptible to the dire consequences when a serious, infectious disease such as varicella, is left unabated and uncontrolled," the county stated.

Source: CNN.com

Here We Go Again
Thursday, April 04 2019

A single mother and teacher in California is suing 45 of the 50 people named in the Operation Varsity Blues college admissions scandal, including actresses Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin. This is the second lawsuit in a couple of weeks coming out of the scandal.

Jennifer Kay Toy has filed a federal lawsuit seeking $500 billion from the defendants she calls "heinous."

"I'm not a wealthy person, but even if I were wealthy I would not have engaged in the heinous and despicable actions of defendants," Kay Toy said in her lawsuit. "I'm outraged and hurt because I feel that my son, my only child, was denied access to a college not because he failed to work and study hard enough, but because wealthy individuals felt that it was OK to lie, cheat, steal and bribe their children's way into a good college."

Kay Toy alleged in the lawsuit that her son, Joshua Toy, who applied to some of the colleges where the cheating took place, was overlooked in favor of people who had wealth and influence.

"I'm now aware of the massive cheating scandal wherein wealthy people conspired with people in positions of power and authority at colleges in order to allow their children to gain access to the very colleges that Joshua was rejected from," Toy claimed in the lawsuit. "Plaintiffs simply wanted a fair chance for themselves or their children to go to a good college, and that opportunity for a fair chance was stolen by the actions of the Defendants who feel that, because they are wealthy, they are allowed to lie, cheat and steal from others."

Source: Newsweek.com

Name Calling
Thursday, March 28 2019

The skies may be friendly, but maybe not the airports. Orlando International Airport’s owner, the Greater Orlando Aviation Authority (GOAA), has filed a lawsuit against Melbourne Airport Authority (MAA) for naming its airport Orlando Melbourne International Airport.

According to the lawsuit, GOAA claims the MAA is deliberately trying to mislead passengers and is promoting "unfair competition" by using the word "Orlando" in its name. GOAA is demanding "Orlando" be removed from the name and compensation be paid. For the record, neither airport is in the heart of the city: Orlando International is 12 miles outside of the city center; the smaller Orlando Melbourne International Airport is about 60 miles southeast of the larger airport and 70 miles from the city center.

Negotiations have been under way to resolve this matter since 2015 when the name was first used. The current lawsuit was recently filed after ongoing negotiations failed.

Attorneys for the GOAA wrote that: “Given the passenger volume of Orlando International Airport, its established reputation, extensive capital investments, superior customer service amenities, and its location in Orlando, one of the Nation’s top tourism destinations, it is obvious that MLB is attempting to use the Illegal Advertisements to confuse customers in order to divert business from Orlando International Airport and misappropriate GOAA’s established goodwill and brand recognition of the Orlando International Airport Trademark."

MAA counters that the argument has no merit. News reports indicate GOAA is using taxpayer money to fund the lawsuit.

Source: simpleflying.com



Question of the Week   
Prior to 2016, what was the last Presidential election year in which the candidate who won had never before held elected public office?
More Questions
Quote of the Day   
 
"And so it has come to this.Two oil tankers were just attacked in the Gulf of Oman, presumably by Iran. The United States and China are facing off in a confrontation that is about far more than trade. The southern border remains anarchic and uncontrolled.And Congress is asking: 'Can I get the icon in cornflower blue?'Here is the situation: The president of these United States gets from place to place…[more]
 
 
—Kevin D. Williamson, National Review
— Kevin D. Williamson, National Review
 
Liberty Poll   

Should the 2020 U.S. Census add a multi-part question regarding U.S. citizenship, including specifically whether the respondent is or is not a U.S. citizen?