John Lott, our favorite economist at least in the arena of criminology and Second Amendment scholarship…
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Stat of the Day: Everywhere Guns Are Banned, Murder Rates Increase

John Lott, our favorite economist at least in the arena of criminology and Second Amendment scholarship, cogently summarizes the actual, real-world, data-based sociological effect of "gun control" laws:

. While gun bans (either a ban on all guns or on all handguns) have been imposed in many places, every time guns have been banned, murder rates have gone up.

One would think that one time, just out of simple randomness, murder rates would have gone down or at least stayed the same.  Yet in every single case for which we have crime data both before and after the ban, murder rates have gone up, often by huge amounts."

. It's almost as if more guns mean less crime.…[more]

October 20, 2017 • 11:58 am

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Home Press Room CFIF Endorses the PROMOTE Act
CFIF Endorses the PROMOTE Act Print
Friday, April 07 2017

[DOWNLOAD CFIF'S LETTER HERE (PDF)]

 April 7, 2017 

The Honorable Darrell Issa 
U.S. House of Representatives 
2269 Rayburn House Office Building 
Washington, D.C. 20515 

Dear Congressman Issa:

On behalf of more than 250,000 supporters and activists across the nation, the Center for Individual Freedom (CFIF) writes in support of your introduction of the Performance Royalty Owners of Music Opportunity to Earn (PROMOTE) Act of 2017, H.R. 1914. 

Fairness dictates that musical artists and performers should possess the freedom to negotiate performance rights with broadcasters playing their songs.  Unfortunately, while current law allows artists to mutually bargain with satellite, cable or internet stations, traditional terrestrial radio remains immune under federal law from having to negotiate with artists to play their songs.  That deprives artists of their property rights, the fruits of their labor. 

Your legislation would remedy that unfairness by allowing "performing artists to opt out of having their music played on the radio if the performing artist is not being paid an agreed-upon performance royalty."  The PROMOTE Act advances fundamental concepts of fairness by requiring consent prior to use of artists' creations, and will incentivize future innovation. 

CFIF believes that property rights, including intellectual property (IP) rights for artists and musicians, must be fiercely defended.  America's foundation of strong IP protections, including within the very text of the Constitution, has made us the most innovative, prosperous and artistically productive nation in human history.  The PROMOTE Act that you have introduced accords with that tradition, and would benefit American consumers, creators and innovators. 

CFIF therefore applauds your legislation and respectfully encourages other Members of Congress to join you.  Thank you very much for your leadership on this extremely important matter. 

Sincerely, 
/s/
Jeffrey Mazzella 
President 

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