Credit Avik Roy for being open-minded. A week after unveiling his ambitious – and controversial…
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Avik Roy Updates His ObamaCare Alternative

Credit Avik Roy for being open-minded.

A week after unveiling his ambitious – and controversial – reform of ObamaCare, Roy, a well-respected health policy expert, is incorporating some of the best criticisms as amendments to his plan.

Most of the changes are highly technical, and not worth delving into in a short blog post. For readers interested in specifics, here is the link to Roy’s updates page.

What’s refreshing about Roy’s response to his fellow conservatives is his willingness to defend his ideas, but not to the point of brushing aside legitimate improvements.

As to the biggest concern – that preserving ObamaCare’s insurance exchanges makes it possible that Democrat congressional majorities in the future might use them as a springboard to a single-payer system…[more]

August 21, 2014 • 02:38 pm

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Jester's CourtroomLegal tales stranger than stranger than fiction: Ridiculous and sometimes funny lawsuits plaguing our courts.
Jester’s Courtroom
What Took So Long?
Thursday, August 21 2014

Nearly two years after a police stop and citation that made national news, a grandmother is suing a Dallas-area police officer and city for allegedly being "antagonized and assaulted."

According to news reports, on August 19, 2012, then 77-year-old grandmother Lynn Bedford was stopped for going 66 mpg in a 50-mph zone.  Citing a bladder infection and the need to use a restroom, Bedford refused to get out of the car or hand over her driver's license, prompting Sgt. Gene Geheb to open the door and remove Bedford from the car. Bedford ultimately received two citations: one for speeding and another for failing to provide ID.

Originally, Bedford said she did not have plans to sue.  Now, two years later, she has changed her mind and is seeking a jury trial and damages against the City of Keene and Sgt. Geheb for, among other things, unreasonable search and seizure and for having in place policies that show “deliberate indifference to the constitutional rights of citizens.” In the federal lawsuit filed in Dallas, Bedford claims she “suffered a painfully-bruised tailbone, bruising on her arm, and a sore shoulder.”
 
In September 2012, Keene Chief Rocky Alberti defended his officer’s actions: “The incident has been reviewed thoroughly by the Keene Police Department and the City of Keene administration,” Alberti said. “All parties have concluded that Sgt. Geheb did not violate any state laws or department policies, and in fact was following department policy in regards to violators not providing information.”

Source: Dallasnews.com

A Prayer for Relief
Thursday, August 14 2014

In the wake of a threatened lawsuit, a North Carolina restaurant is no longer offering a discount to diners who pray in public before their meal.

Mary's Gourmet Diner in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, announced by way of a note on the front door of the establishment that the 15% discount previously offered to customers who chose to pray before their meal was discontinued. According to news reports, Mary's Gourmet stated on a Facebook post that, "There's a lot of craziness going on in regard to the 15% discount. ... I will say that it is not a 'policy,' it's a gift we give random to customers who take a moment before their meal.  Who you talk to or meditate on etc. is your business."

The discontinued discount at Mary's appeared to be prompted by a letter from a Madison, Wisconsin-based Freedom from Religion Foundation, which urged the restaurant to stop.  Legal experts have noted that it is fine for a business to give out random discounts.  For example, a restaurant in Los Angeles, California, gives discounts for voice impersonations.

Co-owner Mary Haglund told one media outlet that her intent had always been positive and that she never meant to offend anyone.

Source: Newsday.com

How Not to Pay a Probation Bill
Thursday, August 07 2014

An Escambia County, Florida, man is back behind bars after stealing more than $140,000 worth of items from local residences and selling them to pay his federal probation costs.

Michael Collins, who was on probation for bank robbery, allegedly broke into homes through unlocked doors and stole jewelry, cash, laptops and medication. Collins later sold the items at a local flea market. Police were able to identify and locate Collins through security footage shot at one of the homes. Almost $15,000 of the sold items have been recovered by local police.

Collins is now being charged with burglary, grand theft, criminal mischief and petty theft.

Source: Pensacola News Journal

Rush-Hour Traffic Drives Lawsuit
Wednesday, July 30 2014

A New Jersey woman is suing her former employer on grounds that her employer failed to make accommodation for a disability that prevented her from driving in rush-hour traffic.

Andrea DeGerolamo of Berlin, New Jersey, is suing Fulton Financial Corp. for wrongful termination. According to news reports, DeGerolamo took medical leave from the company for anxiety and depression, which, her lawsuit states, "was especially aggravated by crowded roadways experienced during the heavy traffic of rush-hour."  When DeGerolamo returned to work, she cited her medical condition as a qualifying disability that entitled her to a modified work schedule that would avoid rush-hour traffic. The company approved DeGerolamo's request to come into work after morning traffic died down, and then leave before the evening rush-hour started.

After returning to work, DeGerolamo was given a reduced work load, which she claims was an unwarranted demotion.  Shortly after, she says she was fired, prompting her lawsuit.

Fulton Financial Corp. declined to comment to The Huffington Post, citing pending legal matters.

Source: The Huffington Post

Not Such Good Vibrations
Wednesday, July 23 2014

An appellate court judge dismissed a recent lawsuit against Wal-Mart and Ticketmaster, calling the lawsuit “the most frivolous complaint I have ever seen.”

Edward J. Mierzwa sued the retail giant and ticket-service company after he couldn’t get the Beach Boys tickets he wanted at a self-service Ticketmaster at the local Wal-Mart. Rather than obtain tickets for the “reserved seats” that went on sale at 10 a.m., Mierzwa’s transaction wasn’t completed until 10:04 a.m., resulting in “outer perimeter” seats.

According to his lawsuit, “the opportunity was squandered” because a Wal-Mart employee was not immediately available to complete the transaction. Mierzwa claims the action was a violation of the New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act.

In tossing the complaint, the judge said Mierzwa still received the "best available seats" available when the order was entered.

In upholding the lower court ruling, the appellate court agreed with the dismissal of the suit, saying that Mierzwa failed to prove the three elements of fraud — unlawful conduct, a loss and a relationship between the unlawful conduct and the loss.
 
Source: Texans for Lawsuit Reform



Question of the Week   
On which one of the following dates during the War of 1812 did British troops march into our nation’s capital and set fire to the city?
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Quote of the Day   
 
"These are the worst people on earth. They openly, proudly crucify enemies, enslave women and murder men en masse. These are not the usual bad guys out for land, plunder or power. These are primitive cultists who celebrate slaughter, glory in bloodlust and slit the throats of innocents as a kind of sacrament.  We have now seen what air cover for Kurdish/Iraqi boots on the ground can achieve. But…[more]
 
 
—Charles Krauthammer, Syndicated Columnist
— Charles Krauthammer, Syndicated Columnist
 
Liberty Poll   

Will the indictment of Texas Governor Rick Perry hurt or help him politically?